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2 Answers
5 Helpful Votes
Q.

anger issues making me hit myself in the head and chest, how can i stop doing this? ended up getting mri to check

I got so angry one time, i had to get an mri to check to see if i broke a bone in my wrist.  I have migraine headaches and when i don't have a cigarette for a while, i seem to "Lose my mind" in a manner of speaking.  I need help and am too embarrassed to seek or ask for help.  I gave myself two black eyes during one episode.  please help me figure this out and how to deal with it.

 

Answers from Contributors (3)

841 Answers
21,113 Helpful Votes
24 Followers
A.

You’ve already taken the 1st step in overcoming your negative response to anger. Hopefully that acknowledgement of a problem will propel you forward. Perhaps some of my thoughts as follows will assist your efforts:

-          Identify the cause of your displeasure - Keep a journal and annotate what triggered your anger and the resultant self-abuse behavior. Were you feeling frustrated, disappointed, powerless in efforts to have what you wanted, resentful or angry at others, etc.?  List the feelings that you had before and after the angry outburst occurred.  For example you may feel afraid of yourself, may have felt embarrassed, or felt like you might be arrested, placed in a hospital for your own protection, or feel like you wanted to harm someone else.

-          Many episodes of self-destructive behaviors are a result of some type of irrational fear. For example some individuals may feel like they are “No Good”, nobody cares about me anyway,   or that things will never change. It is helpful to identify those fears and confirm to yourself that they are irrational.

-          Review the causes and irrational fears as outlined in your journal. Set up positive alternatives to your self-destructive behavior.  For example scream in a private place, cry, talk to others, listen to music, and most of all promote self-esteem by reaffirming to yourself that you are a valuable person.  

-          This problem will not just disappear. Ask friends, family, church clergy, school officials, or your physician for help and guidance with a confidential problem.  Join an anger management support group. Many times these groups are run in an anonymous fashion.  Sometimes just listening to others who have had your same feelings; and having a forum for you to express your feelings, can lead to improvement of your condition.      

-          If things become too overwhelming and you feel like hurting yourself or others, it is time to seek professional treatment through counseling and medications.

Best wishes for a productive journey in liking yourself and in experiencing a joyful life.

 

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3 Answers
12 Helpful Votes
A.

I use a 40lb punching bag that is on a chain from the rafters in my garage.I only use my feet to hit it.It's very satisfying to get my anger out this way and no broken bones! I hope that helps! Be sure to wear socks and a sturdy pair of shoes too and kick the middle of the bag for the most action!

The opinions expressed here are solely those of the User.down arrowThe opinions expressed here are solely those of the User.
User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice. Please see the
bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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5 of 9 found this helpful
841 Answers
21,113 Helpful Votes
24 Followers
A.

You’ve already taken the 1st step in overcoming your negative response to anger. You're admitting the problem. Hopefully that acknowledgement of a problem will propel you forward. Perhaps some of my thoughts as follows will assist your efforts:

  •           Identify the cause of your displeasure - Keep a journal and annotate what triggered your anger and the resultant self-abuse behavior. Were you feeling frustrated, disappointed, powerless in efforts to have what you wanted, resentful or angry at others, etc.?  List the feelings that you had before and after the angry outburst occurred.  For example you may feel afraid of yourself, may have felt embarrassed, or felt like you might be arrested, placed in a hospital for your own protection, or feel like you wanted to harm someone else.
  •           Many episodes of self-destructive behaviors are a result of some type of irrational fear. For example some individuals may feel like they are “No Good”, nobody cares about me anyway,   or that things will never change. It is helpful to identify those fears and confirm to yourself that they are irrational.
  •           Review the causes and irrational fears as outlined in your journal. Set up positive alternatives to your self-destructive behavior.  For example scream in a private place, cry, talk to others, listen to music, and most of all promote self-esteem by reaffirming to yourself that you are a valuable person.  
  •           This problem will not just disappear. Ask friends, family, church clergy, school officials, or your physician for help and guidance with a confidential problem.  Join an anger management support group. Many times these groups are run in an anonymous fashion.  Sometimes just listening to others who have had your same feelings; and having a forum for you to express your feelings, can lead to improvement of your condition.      
  •           If things become too overwhelming and you feel like hurting yourself or others, it is time to seek professional treatment through counseling and medications.

Best wishes for a productive journey in feeling good about yourself and in experiencing a joyful life.

 

The opinions expressed here are solely those of the User.down arrowThe opinions expressed here are solely those of the User.
User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice. Please see the
bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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