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Q.

I am postmenopausal. Can I still get pregnant?

I am 53 years old and have not had a period since May 2011.

Related Topics: Period, Pregnancy, Post-Menopause
 
7 Answers
47 Helpful Votes
A.
Thank you for asking

     With periods off for the last 4 years, you are surely post menopausal and its the time when human body is out of hormones as well as ova reserves to get pregnant.  No matter what you do, pregnancy is impossible after menopause. Any sort of menses like bleeding if you are getting will be abnormal and should be immediately evaluated for local pathologies like malignancy or genital tract infections. 
I hope it helps.
Regards
Dr S Khan
eHealthDesk

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If you really want to get pregnant I would research a fertility specialist in your area. There was a segment on "The Dr's" television show, where a woman had a hysterectomy and later had an egg harvested and had somebody carry her baby for her.  I would not have thought this was possible. If this is something you really want, make sure you contact several specialists and get more than one opinion. Good luck. 

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If you experienced some menopausal symptoms, and now you are at postmenopausal stage. This is the statement quoted from an article on the website "Womenshealth": "Once you have gone through menopause, you can't get pregnant anymore. Some people call the years leading up to a woman's last period menopause, but that time actually is the menopausal transition, or perimenopause". 

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Some postmenopausal women are wistful about the fact that they are no longer able to conceive a baby. Even if another child is not in the cards, menopause marks the end of reproductive life and the end of an era.

However, many women find that menopause comes as a relief, as there is no longer any need to worry about hormonal contraception, unplanned pregnancies, or untimely periods. However, even though you can't get pregnant after menopause, you could still contract asexually transmitted disease (STD), so it is important to remember to practice safe sex by using a barrier method such as a condom or female condom.

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