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Roseola

Also called: Exanthema Subitum, Roseola Infantum

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There is no known way to prevent the spread of roseola. The infection usually affects young children but rarely adults. Therefore, it is thought that...
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22 of 30 found this helpful
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In most cases, roseola does not require treatment other than trying to bring down a high fever. Antibiotics cannot treat roseola because it is caused...
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To diagnose roseola, a doctor will take a history and do a thorough physical exam. A diagnosis of roseola is often uncertain until the fever goes...
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In most cases, a child with roseola develops a mild upper-respiratory illness, followed by a high fever (often higher than 103F) for three to seven...
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Roseola is contagious and spreads through tiny drops of fluid from the nose and throat of infected people. Someone who has not yet developed symptoms...
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Roseola can be caused by two common and closely related viruses: human herpes virus (HHV) type 6 and type 7. These two viruses belong to the same...
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Roseola is a viral illness that usually affects children between the ages of 6 months and 2 years. It is typically marked by several days of high...
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Complications are rare with roseola except in children with suppressed immune systems. Individuals with healthy immune systems generally develop...
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Roseola is referred to by a number of other names. It was formally called roseola infantum or roseola infantilis. Because the rash appears so...
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Roseola is a mild viral illness of sudden onset and short duration that most commonly affects young children. Roseola is most common in children 6...
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Roseola is primarily caused by a virus called human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) and less commonly by human herpes virus 7 (HHV-7).
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What is most striking is that the child seems so well despite having a high fever.
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The fever can be quite high. The fever averages 103.5F (39.7C), but it can go up as high as 106F (41.2C).
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The fever of roseola lasts three to five days followed by a rash lasting about one to two days. Roseola usually resolves without any treatment.
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Keep calm and help the child to the floor, loosening any clothing around the neck. Remove any sharp objects that could cause injury, and turn the...
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