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Radiation Surgery

Also called: Radiosurgery, Stereotactic External Beam Irradiation, SEBI, Radiation Therapy, Radiotherapy

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Cancer is bad news for any person, especially so if it has metastasized to the brain. One of the most common therapies for such patients, whole brain...
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The goal of radiotherapy is to damage the cancer cells and stop their growth or kill them. This works because the rapidly dividing (reproducing)...
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Radiation therapy treats cancer by using high energy to kill tumor cells without hurting healthy cells. The goal is to kill or damage cancer cells...
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Late side effects from radiation therapy take months and sometimes years to develop and are usually permanent. But keep in mind that the possibility...
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Other early side effects are usually specific to the site that receives the radiation. Eating Problems Radiation therapy to the head, neck, or parts...
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You may notice some hair loss, but most often only in the treated area. If you do have hair loss, it will usually occur suddenly and come out in...
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The effect external radiation therapy has on your skin is similar to the effect that exposure to the sun can have. You can expect to see some changes...
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The fatigue you feel from having cancer and receiving radiation therapy can be overwhelming and keep you from doing the things you normally do, such...
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There are actually two kinds of side effects from radiation therapy -- early and late. Early side effects, such as nausea or fatigue, are usually...
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To reduce skin reactions that occur as a result of radiation treatment: Gently cleanse the treated area using lukewarm water and a mild soap such as...
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Everyone has a different level of energy, so radiation treatment will affect each patient differently. Patients frequently experience fatigue after...
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Radiation therapy is usually given to treat breast cancer after a lumpectomy and sometimes after a mastectomy to reduce your risk of the cancer...
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After your radiation therapy sessions are complete, you will visit your doctor for periodic follow-up exams and diagnostic X-rays. Your doctor will...
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It is the use of high-dose X-rays or other high-energy rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. It is also called radiotherapy.
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There are two kinds of side effects from radiation therapy -- early and late. Early side effects, such as nausea or fatigue, are usually temporary...
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