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Breast Cancer

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A well-coordinated team which includes input from the pathologist, surgeon, and radiologist is usually the best way to approach treatment decisions...
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Lymph nodes are small glandular structures that filter tissue fluids. They filter out and ultimately try to provide an immune response to particles...
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Breast cancer is not a single disease. There are many types of breast cancer, and they may have vastly different implications. Breast cancers range...
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If you have a strong (positive) family history for breast cancer, ovarian cancer or even prostate cancer, this information is relevant to your...
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Genetic testing is not 100% accurate. If a test is negative, a person still has a chance of developing breast cancer. If the test is positive, there...
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Unlike the more common form of breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer does not generally show up as a lump. The disease grows as nests or sheets...
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Prognostic indicators are characteristics of a patient and her tumor that may help a doctor predict a recurrence of breast cancer. These are some...
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The type of treatment for local breast cancer recurrences depends on your initial treatment. If you had a lumpectomy, local recurrence is usually...
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If you've been treated for breast cancer, you should continue to practice breast self-exam, checking both the treated area and your other breast each...
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Following surgery or radiation, your breast cancer treatment team will determine the likelihood that the cancer will recur outside the breast. This...
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During treatment, radiation must pass through your skin. You may notice some skin changes in the area exposed to radiation. Your skin may become red...
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Radiation therapy is usually given to treat breast cancer after a lumpectomy and sometimes after a mastectomy to reduce your risk of the cancer...
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For breast cancer, chemotherapy drugs are given intravenously (directly into a vein) or orally (by mouth). Once the drugs enter the bloodstream, they...
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When breast cancer is limited to the breast or lymph nodes, chemotherapy may be given after a lumpectomy or mastectomy. This is known as adjuvant...
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Most importantly, you'll need to obtain a family pedigree to determine if there is a cancer development pattern within your family. A family pedigree...
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5 of 9 found this helpful