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Blood Donation

Also called: Pheresis, Apheresis

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Hi, Good question, with just to many answers, you say you looked around the web? yes, did you google this, blood test came back weak b negativeyour...
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A coincidence.....Blood donation does not cause kidney pain.
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Antibiotics can be a cause of liver damage. Fatigue and a low grade fever can be a symptoms of a liver disorder. Were you given possible reasons...
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Hi I found you this nice link, should give you loads of info, but your problem is you donate your blood, and that's were your problem lies, give...
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I don't think that would be a problem, but then again, Blood Banks set their own rules. Those human growth hormones have been long gone in your...
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I think it depends on how severe your anemia is or was, at least that is what i was told.
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The only issue I have come upon is in the following from the Red Cross site, redcrossblood.org.Donors with diabetes who since 1980, ever used...
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Thats normal. Bruising and soreness usually occurs after donating blood, especially if you have small or shallow veins. It happens to me every time.
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Absolutely, there is a high chance that you could be anemic, in your case, most likely, iron deficiency.  Iron deficiency anemia is caused by...
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Well, anxiety is one thing that can raise your blood pressure. So, you may be caught in kind of a strange loop here: The fact you're anxious...
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Serious complications of donor apheresis are rare. Minor complications of donor apheresis can include bleeding at the donation site and feelings of...
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The following list of conditions for which apheresis may be of benefit is not all-inclusive. Apheresis can be used in the treatment of:Myasthenia...
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Apheresis is a medical procedure that involves removing whole blood from a donor or patient and separating the blood into individual components so...
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Hemapheresis is generally avoided if a patient has active infection, unstable heart or lung conditions, severely low white blood cell or platelet...
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All apheresis procedures involve connecting the blood in the patient/donor's veins through tubing to a machine that separates the blood components...
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