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Joseph Bresee, MD, FAAP

Joseph Bresee, MD, FAAPJoseph Bresee, MD, FAAP

Chief, Epidemiology and Prevention, Influenza Division, CDC
CDC
Epidemiology

22 Answers12 Followers1 Best Answer653 Helpful Answer Votes
 

Bio

Joseph Bresee, M.D., FAAP, is chief of the Epidemiology and Prevention Branch in CDC’s Influenza Division, and is a captain in the U.S. Public Health Service. His branch is responsible for conducting influenza surveillance, working to understand influenza disease burden, helping to derive appropriate vaccine and antiviral use policies to prevent seasonal influenza, detecting and preventing avian influenza and pandemic influenza, and providing technical expertise to global public health partners.

Dr. Bresee trained at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and then completed his Pediatric Residency at Children’s Hospital and Medical Center at the University of Washington in Seattle. Dr. Bresee joined CDC in 1993 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer in the Influenza Branch. From 1995 to 2005, Dr. Bresee first served as a staff epidemiologist and medical officer, specializing in viral gastrointestinal infections and respiratory infections. Subsequently, he was promoted to Epidemiology Team Lead. His research and public health activities focused on rotavirus disease and rotavirus vaccines, and he worked to ensure that rotavirus vaccines were available for children in both the U.S. as well as those living in developing countries.

Dr. Bresee continues to work as a general pediatrician on staff at Grady Healthcare. He attends a weekly clinic that serves an underserved population in Atlanta. Dr. Bresee has authored more than 150 peer-reviewed papers and textbook chapters.

Featured Organization

CDC

Credentials

Organization Affiliations:
  • CDC
 

My Answers

A. People with a history of Guillain–Barré Syndrome that occurred after receiving influenza vaccine and who are not at risk for severe illness from...
A. Because people with the flu are contagious while they are ill and that they tend to be most contagious while they have a fever, CDC advises people...
A. Don’t delay getting vaccinated if you want quadrivalent vaccine and it isn’t available. Some quadrivalent flu vaccine is available, but most flu...
A. If your child has the flu, he or she should stay home until at least 24 hours after their fever is gone. Their fever should be gone without the use...
A. Quadrivalent (four virus) flu vaccines are expected to be at least as effective as trivalent (three virus) vaccines, since both flu vaccines protect...
A. Studies have shown that flu vaccine can be safely received in people with a history of mild reactions to egg with some additional safety measures...
A. CDC does not recommend one flu vaccine over another. This includes deciding between trivalent or quadrivalent vaccine or between injection (the flu...
A. There are several options available for the 2013-2014 season.There is a 3-strain, trivalent, flu vaccine will protect against two influenza A viruses...
A. Best Answer
The flu (influenza) and the common cold are caused by different viruses. The flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. The common cold is...
A. Most healthy adults may be able to infect others from 1 day before symptoms start to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick, while children can spread virus...
A. There’s no benefit to receiving the flu shot a second time if you received the flu shot in September. A vaccine received in the Fall should protect...
A. Whether or not you should get the flu shot when you are sick depends, in part, on how severe your illness is. If you are sick with a fever when you...
A. Current manufacturing processes for flu vaccines include growing influenza virus in chicken eggs. For this reason, the finished vaccine contains a...
A. Yes. First and foremost, everyone 6 months of age and older should get a yearly flu vaccine. However, there are people that are more likely to get...
A. Flu vaccines are offered in many locations, including doctor’s offices, clinics, health departments, pharmacies and college health centers, as well...