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Nicole Rogers, MD

Nicole Rogers, MDNicole Rogers, MD

Dermatologist

Dermatology

91 Answers19 Followers756 Helpful Answer Votes
 

Bio

Nicole Rogers, MD, is a board-certified dermatologist and fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. She received her undergraduate degree at Harvard University and her medical degree at Tulane University in New Orleans. Rogers completed her residency training in dermatology at Tulane, where she served as co-chief resident. After that, she performed a fellowship in hair transplantation and lasers in Manhattan with Marc Avram, MD. She is a fellow of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) and serves on their Scientific Committee, and she writes a column for the Hair Transplant Forum International. She has lectured at the ISHRS meetings in Montreal and Boston.

Since residency, Rogers has written numerous articles on surgical and medical treatments for hair loss, including contemporary techniques in hair transplantation, minoxidil, finasteride, and the use of low-level light therapy for hair growth. Together she and Avram published a textbook on hair transplantation and have written chapters for several other textbooks on lasers and skin. She has a special interest in cicatricial (scarring) alopecias and enjoys teaching dermatology residents at Tulane, where she is a volunteer faculty member.

Rogers has a passion for treating both men and women with hair loss, using the most up-to-date medical and surgical techniques. Her professional demeanor and specialty training make her an asset and valued resource for patients.

Credentials

Organization Affiliations:
  • American Academy of Dermatology
 

My Answers

A. Ceramides are natural skin components which, when lost, can lead to dry, itchy skin or eczema. Look for products containing ceramides to help repair...
A. To prevent brown spots from showing up on your skin, the best thing you can do is avoid prolonged, unprotected sun exposure. Use an SPF foundation or...
A. A combination of glycolic or salicylic acid chemical peels, topical hydroquinone (a bleaching cream), and topical tretinoin can help lighten dark...
A. Yes. Foods that are rich in vitamin C help build collagen. These include various citrus foods such oranges, limes, and lemons. Anthocyanin is also...
A. First, try using a different formulation of each. Generally, creams are less drying to the skin than gels. If this does not help, you may need to...
A. Topical retinoids, hydroquinone, and fruit acids (glycolic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, and kojic acid) are the mainstay of treatments for...
A. There is no downside to using chemical peels and microdermabrasion continuously over several years. It will only help prevent photoaging -- damage to...
A. Depending on your job, it may be difficult to keep your hands moist throughout the day. Generally, it's best to moisturize after each hand washing...
A. High-glycemic index diets -- containing lots of simple, refined sugars -- appear to contribute more to acne breakouts than low-glycemic index diets...
A. "Boil" is another term used to describe an abscess, which is a localized soft tissue skin infection. It usually results from staphylococcus bacteria...
A. Most people who have a well-rounded diet will be able to maintain healthy skin. However, to really brighten the skin, I recommend ingesting plenty of...
A. You have most likely genetically inherited your acne. However, your breakouts may get worse when you eat more of certain foods. Many studies have...
A. Most likely they are either milia or sebaceous hyperplasias. Both are sometimes confused with acne. You should see your local dermatologist in order...
A. It's helpful to ingest foods that are high in antioxidants. These foods can help absorb the free radicals created in your body by UV light exposure...
A. These are referred to as skin tags and they tend to run in families. They are not dangerous. But they can become very bothersome cosmetically and...