My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up
Rounded Top

Nicole Rogers, MD

Nicole Rogers, MDNicole Rogers, MD

Dermatologist

Dermatology

91 Answers19 Followers772 Helpful Answer Votes
 

Bio

Nicole Rogers, MD, is a board-certified dermatologist and fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. She received her undergraduate degree at Harvard University and her medical degree at Tulane University in New Orleans. Rogers completed her residency training in dermatology at Tulane, where she served as co-chief resident. After that, she performed a fellowship in hair transplantation and lasers in Manhattan with Marc Avram, MD. She is a fellow of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) and serves on their Scientific Committee, and she writes a column for the Hair Transplant Forum International. She has lectured at the ISHRS meetings in Montreal and Boston.

Since residency, Rogers has written numerous articles on surgical and medical treatments for hair loss, including contemporary techniques in hair transplantation, minoxidil, finasteride, and the use of low-level light therapy for hair growth. Together she and Avram published a textbook on hair transplantation and have written chapters for several other textbooks on lasers and skin. She has a special interest in cicatricial (scarring) alopecias and enjoys teaching dermatology residents at Tulane, where she is a volunteer faculty member.

Rogers has a passion for treating both men and women with hair loss, using the most up-to-date medical and surgical techniques. Her professional demeanor and specialty training make her an asset and valued resource for patients.

Credentials

Organization Affiliations:
  • American Academy of Dermatology
 

My Answers

A. You may benefit from a variety of products. Topical vitamin C and E products can help brighten the skin and provide antioxidant effects. Ultrasonic...
A. Unfortunately, there is no easy or "natural" solution for deep laugh lines and forehead wrinkles. You may start with topical retinoid creams, which...
A. Presumably, you mean acne scars. These can be very difficult to treat. The most effective method is usually to add volume to depressed skin areas...
A. You may try a variety of skin lightening and brightening agents, such as products containing kojic acid, azelaic acid, or topical retinoids. Start...
A. Look for products containing retinol, which helps unclog pores and increase the turnover rate of cells to prevent hairs from ingrowing. You might...
A. It is probably not that you are allergic to "any SPF", but rather that you are allergic to the chemical ingredients used in certain sunscreens. You...
A. First, you should probably see your local board certified dermatologist to understand exactly why your skin is reacting this way. It may be as simple...
A. Brown spots on the hands and face have been called liver spots. But there is no connection whatsoever between these spots and the liver. These brown...
A. Topical retinoids and peptides have been shown to dramatically improve signs of skin aging, such as enlarged pores. You may also benefit from using...
A. Daily exfoliation is not a requirement for healthy skin. However, gently sloughing off the top layers of the skin with a beaded wash or loofa sponge...
A. One of the best treatments for large pores is topical retinoic acid, or tretinoin. Tretinoin can be obtained either by prescription from your...
A. No. Shea butter is an excellent moisturizer, but it will not help lighten dark marks on the skin.
A. Many people complain of a general "crepiness" that develops around the eyes, especially in dry weather. First, you may benefit from injections of...
A. Silicone-containing products are excellent at providing a light, smooth emollient to repair dry, flaky skin. They have also been found to improve the...
A. Dark circles are often due to the presence of a vascular plexus located just under the eyes. The skin there is very translucent. So it can result in...