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Nicole Rogers, MD

Nicole Rogers, MDNicole Rogers, MD

Dermatologist

Dermatology

91 Answers17 Followers636 Helpful Answer Votes
 

Bio

Nicole Rogers, MD, is a board-certified dermatologist and fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. She received her undergraduate degree at Harvard University and her medical degree at Tulane University in New Orleans. Rogers completed her residency training in dermatology at Tulane, where she served as co-chief resident. After that, she performed a fellowship in hair transplantation and lasers in Manhattan with Marc Avram, MD. She is a fellow of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) and serves on their Scientific Committee, and she writes a column for the Hair Transplant Forum International. She has lectured at the ISHRS meetings in Montreal and Boston.

Since residency, Rogers has written numerous articles on surgical and medical treatments for hair loss, including contemporary techniques in hair transplantation, minoxidil, finasteride, and the use of low-level light therapy for hair growth. Together she and Avram published a textbook on hair transplantation and have written chapters for several other textbooks on lasers and skin. She has a special interest in cicatricial (scarring) alopecias and enjoys teaching dermatology residents at Tulane, where she is a volunteer faculty member.

Rogers has a passion for treating both men and women with hair loss, using the most up-to-date medical and surgical techniques. Her professional demeanor and specialty training make her an asset and valued resource for patients.

Credentials

Organization Affiliations:
  • American Academy of Dermatology
 

My Answers

A. Absolutely not! You may shower as much as you please. It will not cause your hair to thin or fall out. In fact, good scalp hygiene is always a great...
A. There are various cosmetic products available, both over-the-counter or through your hairdresser, that can ""thicken"" the hair by coating the...
A. Most dermatologists recommend foods that are high in antioxidant activity, such as dark red berries, green tea (rich in polyphenols), and omega-3...
A. The two most important elements to your skin care regimen are SPF (daily, in the morning) and a topical retinoid at night, such as OTC retinol creams...
A. Tea tree oil is considered an essential oil, obtained from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia trees. It has been investigated for its potentially...
A. It is never too early to start using a topical retinoid or retinol. These vitamin A derivatives can help normalize the skin cells and repair damage...
A. The short answer to this is no. In fact, the reason we use Botox (botulinum toxin) in the field of dermatology is to reduce the movement of facial...
A. Dermabrasion is a surgical treatment, and is a much more invasive treatment than microdermabrasion. It involves the use of a wire brush, an ablative...
A. Loofah is a plant sponge harvested and dried for use in cosmetics. Many people use it in skin care for its exfoliating effects. If you are using a...
A. In theory, it can. But be sure not to irritate your skin by excessive use of tretinoin cream. You may flare your rosacea if you're not careful.
A. Yes. You can try undergoing radiofrequency-based laser treatments, such as with Exilis, to help improve tissue tightness in the cheeks. Also...
A. No. There is no link between caffeine consumption and wrinkles. The best way to avoid wrinkles at a young age is to stay out of the sun, not smoke...
A. Eye creams with caffeine in them can help reduce under-eye puffiness. Topical retinoids (vitamin A derivatives) can also be helpful. Be careful when...
A. Fractionated lasers work best for addressing fine lines and wrinkles in the skin. They are very effective!
A. Stretch marks are almost impossible to make disappear. Certain lasers, such as fractionated technology, may help even out some of the textural...