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Nicole Rogers, MD

Nicole Rogers, MDNicole Rogers, MD

Dermatologist

Dermatology

91 Answers19 Followers779 Helpful Answer Votes
 

Bio

Nicole Rogers, MD, is a board-certified dermatologist and fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. She received her undergraduate degree at Harvard University and her medical degree at Tulane University in New Orleans. Rogers completed her residency training in dermatology at Tulane, where she served as co-chief resident. After that, she performed a fellowship in hair transplantation and lasers in Manhattan with Marc Avram, MD. She is a fellow of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) and serves on their Scientific Committee, and she writes a column for the Hair Transplant Forum International. She has lectured at the ISHRS meetings in Montreal and Boston.

Since residency, Rogers has written numerous articles on surgical and medical treatments for hair loss, including contemporary techniques in hair transplantation, minoxidil, finasteride, and the use of low-level light therapy for hair growth. Together she and Avram published a textbook on hair transplantation and have written chapters for several other textbooks on lasers and skin. She has a special interest in cicatricial (scarring) alopecias and enjoys teaching dermatology residents at Tulane, where she is a volunteer faculty member.

Rogers has a passion for treating both men and women with hair loss, using the most up-to-date medical and surgical techniques. Her professional demeanor and specialty training make her an asset and valued resource for patients.

Credentials

Organization Affiliations:
  • American Academy of Dermatology
 

My Answers

A. Modern hair restoration no longer uses the oversized “plugs” from 10-20 years ago. Now it's a process by which people can receive natural-looking...
A. This is unclear. It may be that your hair was previously more "weathered", meaning it had been subjected to the effects of chemical overtreatment or...
A. The short answer is no, especially if no chemicals or treatments are being applied to your scalp or hair during the massage.
A. Coating your hair with oil, silicone, or dimethicone-based products can certainly help replace the shine that may be lost with excessive chemical...
A. The top of the scalp is where the clinical trials were performed in women. Thus the company is limited in what they can recommend, especially for an...
A. The short answer is no. Most medications, if they are contributing to hair loss, will cause a shedding process. Breakage is more commonly due to...
A. It depends on the degree of damage to the scalp. If you had a severe chemical burn, there is a chance that it may not grow back. However, if the bald...
A. Petroleum jelly is used successfully by many African-Americans to help smooth their hair and lock moisture into the scalp. People who should NOT use...
A. Gray hair results from the loss of functional melanocytes in the bulb of the hair. These are the pigment-producing cells, which transfer pigment...
A. As we age, the sebum production in our skin and our scalp declines. This can be a welcoming change for some -- less shampooing, less acne, or less...
A. Early graying of the hair is often something that runs in families. You probably can't do much to prevent this. A diet high in antioxidant foods...
A. There is some basic research and data that suggest that the phytosterols -- including beta-sitosterol that is found in pumpkin seeds -- can block the...
A. Topical minoxidil is what you need to be applying to your scalp to help achieve thicker hair and to keep it in the actively growing anagen phase for...
A. No. There is no evidence to suggest a difference in the rate of hair growth between men and women.
A. Yes, if the coloring is done in combination with the application of high heat or relaxers. Color alone does not cause nearly as much damage to the...