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Mark A. Stacy, MD

Mark  A. Stacy, MDMark  A. Stacy, MD

Director, Duke Medicine

Parkinson's Disease
Neurology

18 Answers8 Followers510 Helpful Answer Votes
 

Bio

Mark Stacy, MD, is the Director of the Duke Movement Disorders Clinic, Professor of Medicine (Neurology) and Vice Dean for Clinical Research at Duke University School of Medicine. 

Mark Stacy’s clinical and research interests include Parkinson’s disease, motor and non-motor symptoms of wearing off, and pathological gambling and other impulse-control disorders.  His previous experience includes serving as director of the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Research Center at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix and director of the Parkinson’s Disease Clinic and Movement Disorders Center at the University of Missouri.  

In addition to his current clinical and leadership roles at Duke, he serves as advisor and consultant on numerous national and community committees, including WE MOVE, the Parkinson Study Group, the Dystonia Study Group, the National Parkinson Foundation, and the American Academy of Neurology.

Stacy has published numerous peer-reviewed manuscripts, book chapters, and review articles on the topics of Parkinson’s disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, Tourette’s syndrome and other tic and movement disorders.  He is also the editor of The Handbook of Dystonia.

Credentials

Organization Affiliations:
  • Duke Medicine
  • American Academy of Neurology
  • Dystonia Study Group
  • National Parkinson Foundation
  • Parkinson Study Group
  • WE MOVE
  • Duke Movement Disorders Clinic
  • Duke Neurology Clinical Research Center
 

My Answers

A. Potassium supplements should not interfere with PD medications. However, too high or too low levels of potassium may produce neurological symptoms or...
A. I do not know know why UTI are so common in PD, but do not believe it is from the PD or the medications. I believe it is from a tendency to...
A. When still working at the Muhammad Ali Center about 10 years ago, I asked one of my fellows, Dr. Holly Shill, to look at our PD population change...
A. Parkinson's disease is rarely inherited. The only autosomal dominant type PD known is associated with a gene named, "Parkin." This can be...
A. There are several types of pain associated with PD. Hip or shoulder pain - particularly on the side most affected by PD - may be an early sign...
A. ... As for word finding difficulties, I look at PD as a condition that affects the RAM on a computer. The basal ganglia initiate motor and thinking...
A. There are no IV [intravenous] PD formulations available in the United States, but IV lisuride and apomorphine are available in Europe. In...
A. Dizziness is extremely common in PD, and is a result of the condition itself, PD medications, and other medications. What typically happens is a...
A. Rapidly fluctuating blood pressure may be seen with advancing PD. The pressure may elevate when a patient is in an "off" state, and having...
A. I believe your step-father may have a condition termed "REM Behavior Disorder." This is associated with vivid dreaming - and dreaming while...
A. Leg weakness is not typically a first sign in PD. However, PD usually is associated with stiffness and slowness of the limbs, and this may feel like...
A. PD is typically a 20 year illness, but can range from 10 - 40 years. There are 2 basic subcategories: Tremor dominant and Postural Instability/Gait...
A. The tremor of PD may be suppressed or amplified in many settings, and while you may notice less tremor in one setting, someone else will report more...
A. PD is a condition that disrupts normal nerve activity. Although we have not discovered the reasons for this, we have described the typical changes...
A. We have recently published a paper on this topic. It may be found by going to PubMed, and searching: "DOMINION." )You may also type in...