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Michael W. Smith, MD

Michael W. Smith, MDMichael W. Smith, MD

Internist, WebMD Medical Expert
WebMD
Internal Medicine

134 Answers88 Followers3 Best Answers11,142 Helpful Answer Votes
 

Bio

As medical director and chief medical editor at WebMD, Michael W. Smith, MD, is in charge of the medical team that is responsible for upholding the accuracy and credibility of WebMD content, including health news, features, videos, tools, and health reference information.

He first joined WebMD in 1999, and now oversees a team of staff physicians and medical reviewers across the U.S. responsible for creating content and assuring its continued medical accuracy and relevance to the WebMD audience.

Dr. Smith is a regular guest on The Weather Channel and is featured monthly on Fox 5 News in New York to discuss the latest health headlines. Other appearances include Fox News, MSNBC, CBS’ The Early Show, and Katie Couric's web-based show @KatieCouric, among others. In addition, he has appeared in multiple publications, including Men's Health, Newsweek, Forbes, and Reader's Digest and was featured as the Internet's Top Doc in USA Weekend. He has also been interviewed by local and nationally syndicated radio stations, magazines, and newspapers across the country, speaking on everything from hangover remedies to navigating the Internet for accurate, credible health information.

Dr. Smith also volunteers at the Good Samaritan Health Center in Atlanta, where he sees patients who do not have health insurance or are unable to pay for health care.

In 2012, Dr. Smith was selected to America’s Top Physicians by the Consumers’ Research Council of America.

As a general internist, Dr. Smith's interest and knowledge span a wide array of medical topics. Arthritis is an area of personal interest to him, having developed ankylosing spondylitis in his college years. He is particularly interested in prevention and helping people live a healthy, active lifestyle and is an American Council on Exercise certified personal trainer.

Dr. Smith graduated from Mercer University School of Medicine in Macon, Ga., in 1994, then did his internship in internal medicine at the Medical Center of Central Georgia in Macon. He finished his internal medicine residency -- his final year as chief resident -- at Georgia Baptist Medical Center in Atlanta. He became board-certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and then entered private practice as a primary care physician. He is pursuing a Master of Business Administration.

Dr. Smith is a member of the American College of Physicians and the HealthLeaders Media Council.

Featured Organization

WebMD

Credentials

Organization Affiliations:
  • Chief Medical Editor, WebMD
  • American Board of Internal Medicine
  • American College of Physicians
  • American Medical Association
 

My Answers

A. There is a lot of hype around "detoxing" and "cleansing" these days. Most of what you'll hear is untrue, and can be just a waste of your time and...
A. Since there is generally no heat involved in the pickling process, it doesn’t significantly change the nutritional value of foods. This is...
A. As you are probably aware, the issue with eating certain types of fish when you’re pregnant is mercury. Mercury is found in higher levels in certain...
A. Although milk and dairy are the best sources of calcium, you can certainly get enough even if you don’t drink milk.If dairy milk, or cow's milk...
A. Studies have shown that a low-carb diet can be safe for people with diabetes. However, I really don’t like the idea of any diet that severely...
A. A vitamin deficiency is a possibility. But, given that there are so many other possible causes of numbness, some of which can be serious, you should...
A. When it comes down to it, most nutrition experts do believe in the calories in-calories out approach when it comes to weight loss or gain, meaning...
A. Given the choice, eating the actual vegetable is a healthier approach. Both the vegetable supplements (juice) and the actual vegetables have the...
A. I’m not sure what you mean by "suddenly". But it’s unfortunately common for cholesterol levels to rise as we age, particularly if you have a family...
A. Vitamin D3 is often the form of vitamin D that you’ll see in vitamins and supplements.The answer to this question depends on your age. Women 70 and...
A. The most important thing you can do is drink plenty of fluids. If you’re drinking enough, your urine should be clear or light yellow.If you have...
A. The exact amount of protein and fat you need depends on the number of calories you need each day, which in turn, is based on factors such as your...
A. The risk of too much folic acid is low. But, as with any vitamin, it is possible to consume too much folic acid if you combine supplements with food...
A. Foods that are rich in folic acid include leafy green vegetables like spinach, cereals fortified with folic acid, lentils, and avocados. While it’s...
A. If you can keep it up, counting calories is a pretty good way to lose weight. It can be tough for some people to stick to over time. However, one of...