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Elizabeth Ward, MS, RD

Elizabeth Ward, MS, RDElizabeth Ward, MS, RD

Author

Nutrition
Pregnancy

13 Answers11 Followers77 Helpful Answer Votes
 

Bio

Elizabeth M. Ward, M.S., R.D., is a freelance writer and nutrition consultant. Her latest book is MyPlate for Moms, How to Feed Yourself & Your Family Better. Ward is also the author of Expect The Best: Your Guide to Healthy Eating Before, During, & After Pregnancy; The Pocket Idiot’s Guide to the New Food Pyramids; The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Feeding Your Baby and Toddler; Healthy Foods, Healthy Kids, A Complete Guide to Nutrition for Children from Birth to Six Years Old; and Pregnancy Nutrition: Good Health for You and Your Baby. Ward regularly writes for WebMD, Muscle & Fitness HERS magazine, and Men’s Fitness magazine.

As a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly known as the American Dietetic Association) for nine years, Ward was featured in nearly 1,000 print and broadcast interviews, including CNN, U.S. News & World Report, The New York Times, and The Boston Globe.  She has appeared on the Today Show and The Dr. Oz Show, and is a regular guest on Fox 25’s Morning News in Boston.

 

Ward has been a speaker at more than 100 professional meetings, including The American College of Nurse-Midwives, The American Dietetic Association, The Massachusetts Dietetic Association, The Florida Dietetic Association, The National Association of Catering Executives, The Pennsylvania School Food Service Association, and the International Congress of Dietetics in Paris.

 

My Answers

A. When it comes to pregnancy pounds, timing matters. Chances are, weight gain during the first three months will be minimal -- and should be...
A. In the short term, gaining the suggested amount of weight reduces the risk of preterm birth (birth before 37 weeks of gestation) and promotes a baby...
A. Pregnancy hormones can play havoc with appetite, causing some women to feel famished. Others are daunted by nausea, vomiting, and fatigue that...
A. It's difficult to understand why some women gain more than the recommended amounts during one pregnancy when they seem to be monitoring every bite...
A. Avoid using your pregnancy as a reason to overeat or to choose low-nutrient, high-fat foods over more nutritious fare. Giving in too often to...
A. According to the IOM (Institute of Medicine), the ideal situation is conceiving at a healthy weight, and gaining the right number of pounds for the...
A. Most doctors base their recommendation of weight gain on the weight of the mom before pregnancy. Women with a normal BMI (body mass index) should...
A. That is a myth. Gaining too much weight will not necessarily cause the baby to be larger. Just because you are "eating for two" doesn’t mean you...
A. Forget about dieting for at least six weeks postpartum and focus on eating a healthy diet. Most women are sleep-deprived, tired, and lack the energy...
A. Breastfeeding moms should not go on weight loss diets because they need plenty of calories to lactate and provide the sole source of nutrition to...
A. Calories count throughout pregnancy until the "fourth" trimester (or three months after giving birth) because your body needs good nutrition for the...
A. It is it a myth that breastfeeding burns up lots of calories making milk. You will burn some stored body fat, but your body protects some fat for the...
A. Studies show that at six months after giving birth, moms who got less than six hours of sleep per night had more difficulty losing weight than moms...