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Q.

Is it possible to have a stomach virus without vomiting or diarrhea?

Every so often I experience nausea, fatigue, and stomach pain as if I had a stomach virus--could this just be the way my body expresses the Norovirus?

Related Topics: Stomach, Virus, Vomit, Diarrhea, Nausea
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

Primary Care
5,899 Answers
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A.

Yes, a person can have a gastointestinal virus without vomiting or diarrhea, but those symptoms are typically the things you get. If you had this virus before or a similar virus, you may only have a mild infection with nausea.  You cannot definitively diagnose a Norovirus by symptoms alone, since everyone responds to a viral infection differently.

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Answers from Contributors (1)

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A.
Yes, it is possible to have a stomach virus without vomiting or diarrhea. Norovirus may have a prolonged infectious period even before a patient starts feeling sick. People who recover from the infection keep shedding virus through their stools for weeks and may potentially spread the infection to others.  

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