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Q.

I have been advised to undergo C3R by my eye specialist for the treatment of my Keratoconus . anyone heard of this?

I have been advised to undergo C3R by my eye specialist for the treatment of my Keratoconus or bulging cornea. Has anyone heard of this? What is it exactly?

Related Topics: Keratoconus, Cornea, Eyes
 

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A.

Hello,

Greetings from Advanced Eye Hospital!

CCL / C3R/ CXL or Corneal Collagen Cross Linking is a technique in which the bonds in your cornea are strengthened. Riboflavin, a type of Vitamin B2 is first applied followed by treatment with Ultraviolet A Light.

While conventional collagen cross linking required that one’s cornea be thicker than 400 microns, it is not true today.

Today, we have a newer technique called KXL, wherein the time is drastically reduced from an hour to just about 3 minutes! Also, individuals whose corneas are thinner than 400 microns can now be considered for this procedure using this new technology.

If you suffer from Keratoconus and wish to ascertain whether you are a suitable candidate for this procedure, do drop in to Advanced Eye Hospital, Navi Mumbai for a comprehensive eye check by our Cornea Surgeon.

Regards,

Advanced Eye Team.

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Hi, my wife also suffers from Keratoconus. An Ophthalmologist suggested that she undergo Collagen Cross Linking (C3R or CCL). It is a method to strengthen one’s cornea using UV light and some Vitamin. However, when we took a second opinion, we were told that it can be done for corneas that are thicker than 400 microns. That made my wife an unsuitable candidate for the procedure. I suggest that you have your eyes checked thoroughly before you undergo the procedure.

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I recently underwent Collagen Cross Linking using a new technique. My corneal thickness is less than 400 microns. This new method allows thinner corneas to be operated upon too. Search for a hospital or an eye doctor that uses the newer technique. Good Luck!

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