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Should foreskin be retracted before intercourse?

My husband did not know till recently that the foreskin can be retracted. So we tried it out and he can retract it easily. But he feels the exposed part is now irritably sensitive. Is this normal? Before intercourse, should we manually retract the foreskin? We are not sure if the foreskin will be retracted naturally during penetration. (We also doubt if the penetration is deep enough. I feel only about an inch of his penis is actually getting inside my vagina).
 
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The foreskin will automatically retract during intercourse; that is the beauty of the design. You need not retract it before insertion, nor can you prevent it from retraction during sex. If his penis is overly sensitive, just slow down the process and make sure that the parts are well lubricated. It will be fine. The vast majority of men on this planet are uncircumcised; just the way that God made them, so things will be fine.

As far as penetration is concerned, experiment with a few different positions. It is likely that more than an inch is happening.

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I am not circumcised, and my foreskin sometimes retracts during intercourse, and sometime it does not.  The more enlarged with blood my penis is, the less the skin retracts.

I used to always retract it when first married, but then found that the foreskin can act as a way of aiding penetration if penetration is started when while the foreskin is on the head of the penis.

Most uncircumcised guys I have talked to say that their penis is sensitive enough so that, if the foreskin rolls back and exposes the penile head during intercourse, they are very aware of it.  Most like that, a few don't.  About half of the boys in the town where I grew up were uncut, about half cut, because there were two doctors delivering babies--one tried to talk all parents into leaving their boys intact, the other tried to talk all parents into having their boy(s) uncircumcised.

In my opinion, the majority of uncircumcised males can tell if their foreskin is retracted during intercourse, based on my conversations with other uncircumcised males.

As far as penetration, you can get a good idea of how much penetration there is by measuring (on top) the length of your penis, then during intercourse put a hand down there during fullest penetration you can manage and see WHERE on your penis a finger hits.  How much penis is still outside the vagina?  Then you will have a pretty good answer as to how much penetration there is.

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Hi, Your foreskin should be able to move freely, if its still a bit tight you should try to get him to slowly stretch it, both sideways and length ways, massage some baby oil into it before he starts, and slowly he should find it starts moving better for him.

He needs to get it moving better, and slowly the sensitivity will go, also washing behind it daily will help as well the sensitivity, if he finds that by doing this he gets PE (premature  ejaculation) then he should go and do an exercise called edging, he can find out how to do this on pegym.com under exercises.

Hope this helps for some good sexual encounters.

Good Luck

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