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Q.

I am full time college student want to lose some weight, been having anxiety attacks. Is it still okay to exercise?

When I told my parents about it, my mom asked me if I am getting enough air through my ribs. I did not know.

 

The best discriptions to descripe what I was feeling is that it felt like my ribs are crushing in me.

 

I am way over weight and want to have a better lifestyle and start exercising.

I am wondering if it would be okay to exercise consider my past with anxiety attacks.

 

my record of anxiety attacks counts as 4 or 5 from August to December

Related Topics: Anxiety, Weight, Exercise
 

Answers from Contributors (6)

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A.
Exercise is a great way to deal with anxiety issues!  When I was in college I was diagnosed with anxiety issues and my therapist suggested that I start taking daily walks. They helped me not only have time each day to clear my head and calm my anxiety, but also helped me discover the joys of walking as a form of exercise.  I'm not sure what your comments about the ribs mean, but if you are concerned about it you should see a doctor, or go to student health for free. 

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I've actually been diagnosed with panic disorder for about five years. At first, I was having 3 or 4 severe attacks a day. Now, I rarely have then and when I do, they're what I call "baby attacks." The best way to get through an attack, for me, is to MOVE, Run, walk, jump and down, whatever. 

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Hi My Friend, 

Studies have shown a very strong correlation between a lack of physical activity and the development of anxiety disorders. This relationship isn't entirely clear, but many of the proposed causes of this include:

  • Unused Energy – One of the most frequently cited reasons for anxiety is unused energy. Your body was made to move, and unfortunately when it doesn't move it creates tension. We see this actually with dogs often – dogs that don't get their daily walks often become anxious and high strung, because if they don't work out their energy, that energy turns first into physical tension, and then into mental tension.
  • Increased Stress Hormone – When you feel stress, your body releases a hormone known as cortisol. There's evidence that movement is what depletes cortisol, bringing it back to normal levels. This makes sense, because anxiety itself is the "fight or flight" system. When your body experiences it, it expects you to fight or flight. Inactivity is essentially doing nothing, and that may cause your body to start misfiring your stress and anxiety hormones.
  • Immune System Malfunction – Exercise is also necessary for a regulated immune system, as well as maintaining a healthy hormone balance. There's reason to believe that inactivity prevents these important things from occurring.

There may also be secondary components as well. Those that are often inactive are also often enjoying less experiences, and positive experiences are good for anxiety. Those that aren't working to improve their health may develop small problems that create anxiety on their own. These may all be contributing factors.

So, please go ahead with your plan for exercising!!

Good luck on everything!!

Dhammika Abeygoonawardhane

Sri Lanka


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Hello jean13.  It's very good that you can reach out and talk about your issues.  if you are way overweight then yes, exercise is always recommended...but not always necessary in 2011 i was able to lose 70 lbs in less than 5 months by doing no exercise.  a life changing experience helped me to learn the secret to weight loss and how to look at life for what it is.  Losing weight has to do with working less, not working more.  depending on how overweight you are, you might not want to put too much pressure on a body that's already struggling with an amount of weight that's too much for your frame.  losing weight is 100% mental. if you're mentally in it the body will follow and do its thing as long as you understand to get out of your own way.  i also suffered from anxiety and depression.  i beat the hell out it though.  i had to take 47 pills a week. my condition got worse and worse.  losing weight is about becoming aware of WHAT you are not who you are or what others are saying or doing or what your occupation is.  your body doesn't understand that stuff.  trust me...i speak from experience, not just reciting something i got off the internet, tv or some crap story in the tabloids.  i just got finished losing 15 lbs in a week and a half.  no problem.   i'm telling you that you're much more powerful than you think and much more powerful than you've been taught in school, on tv, in magazines or even in church.  The greatest dietary supplements and pharmacy on the planet is already in you.  it's just waiting for you to throw the switches.  You are divine.  KNOW it!  You are a product of nature, not something that's owned by a corporation.  BE your own president.  I'm always here if you need anything answered or just need to talk. i would like to know how much you weigh or how much you need to lose if you don't mind.  Keep your head up and have a glorious, logical day!

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I think it would help your anxiety . I have anxiety also and when I work out I feel a lot better. I use it as a form of meditation. When you exercise, try and think of things that make you feel peaceful and calm, or try and find your inner strength, center yourself. Using that extra energy should help.

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