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Q.

Is there a specific doctor that I need to see for an anal abcess?

Related Topics: Anus, Vision
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (2)

Primary Care
4,377 Answers
20,968 Helpful Votes
313 Followers
A.
That would be a proctologist (a colo-rectal surgeon). In some areas, a gastroenterologist or general surgeon may do this type of procedure. An anal abscess can be a simple drainage procedure, or a more involved surgical removal, so finding the most skilled specialist is important.

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Internal Medicine and Endocrinology
American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, American Diabetes Association,
41 Answers
2,249 Helpful Votes
35 Followers
A.

A general or rectal surgeon is the appropriate physician to see for treatment of an anal abscess.

An abscess is a collection of pus.  An anal abscess may develop in the deep tissues surrounding the anus or be more shallow under the skin. They both require immediate treatment to lance the abscess and let it drain. Therefore it is important that you see a surgeon. A general practitioner may be able to take care of a small abscess in the office. Antibiotics alone usually cannot treat the problem. 

Without proper treatment, an abscess can cause a widespread infection (septicemia). You are more likely to get an anal abscess if you have diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease such as Crohn’s, engage in anal sex, or have an impaired immune system such as from AIDS or  chemotherapy.

If you have recurrent anal abscesses and there is no clear explanation for their cause, a consultation with a physician who specializes in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (gastroenterologist) may be appropriate.

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