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Q.

I have a itchy rash that comes and goes, what could be causing this?

the rash appears in different areas of my body, for an example, a rash showed up on my wrist and stayed a while and went away.  Later the same day it appeared on my stomach and then on my thighs,etc.  its itchy while it is present.  at one point my hands first turned red and then start to itch really bad to the point I had to wash my hands repeatedly.  I work in the medical field so i wash my hands a million times a day. What could be causing this reaction?


Related Topics: Hand, Thigh, Wrist, Rash, Reaction
 

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Internal Medicine and Endocrinology
American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, American Diabetes Association,
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A.

A persistent rash needs to be evaluated by your general doctor or a dermatologist, a skin doctor.


Hives (urticaria) are red, itchy, raised areas of the skin that can range in size and appear anywhere on your body. The cause of the hives can be drugs, foods, stress, and is unknown in many cases. The fact that the rash appears anywhere on your body suggests this diagnosis. Hives are an allergic reaction and those with asthma and allergies are more prone.  If the cause of your hives can be identified, you should avoid that trigger. Some drugs and foods take days to leave the body, so your doctor may prescribe antihistamines in the meantime to relieve your symptoms.


Contact dermatitis is another possible explanation for your rash. This rash occurs when certain substances come into contact with your skin. Contact dermatitis causes a localized rash on the skin which may be red, sore, itchy, and have bumps or blisters.  There are two kinds of contact dermatitis: irritant or allergic. 

Irritant contact dermatitis is more often painful than itchy, and is caused by a substance damaging the part of your skin where it comes into contact. Contact with acids, soaps, detergents, fabric softeners, or other chemicals may cause irritant contact dermatitis. The reaction often occurs on the hands and is frequently work-related. 

Allergic contact dermatitis is caused by exposure to a substance or material to which you have become extra sensitive or allergic. Common causes include fabrics, clothing, soaps, and nail polish. Rubber gloves are one of the most frequent causes of occupational allergic contact dermatitis, especially in health care workers. 

Seeking professional help from your doctor is the safest way to determine what is causing your rash. 





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A.
Did you ever figure it out? I am a RN and am having the same problem... doctors tell me to take Benadryl (which makes it difficult to work efficiently as I am exhausted when taking this medication).  I have not yet seen a dermatologist but would like to know what you found out....

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I also have this problem...n can't figure it out...I take Zyrtec every couple days..that helps..then a day or two later its back..not know what n why bothers me as much as the itching...hope someone figures it out

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