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Q.

What will cause my big toe nail go black? This is my Left to and partial nail is black in the cornor.

My big tow on my left toe nail in the left end cornor is black and tender to the touch. Sometimes it will shoot out pain. What caused this? I have not hit my to at all. There is slight  bruising on my right toe but not as bad. This really concerns me because it is not going away. 

Related Topics: Bruise, Big Toe, Nail, Toe, Tenderness
 

Answers from Contributors (6)

3 Answers
32 Helpful Votes
A.
Are you a diabetic? if so you need to be seen by your medical provider immediately as this is a sign there is no blood flow to the area which is common with diabetics. I am a diabetic and was told to examine my feet regularly. even if you are not a diabetic I would get your toe checked out and ask about a diabetes screening too. Hope this answer helps you.

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A.
It sounds similar to what my mom has, a fungus growing in/under the nail. Hers however, was not tender or painful. She won't go to the doctor for it because she doesn't wear open toed shoes and just doesn't want to tell the doctor "Hey, look at my black toe" because she thinks it would sound insane. As far as I know the doctor can give you a prescription for a fungicidal pill that will clear it right up.

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Either you banged it and it is bruised, or there can also be a fungus under the nail. Best thing to do is consult your PCP to be sure. Some fungus medicines effect your liver, therefore it would be wise to consult a physician before you use fungicidal medicine.

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Our feet change as we age, and the way you position your feet in your shoes change too.  My arches in my feet are gone, so I have to wear inserts.  You may just need new shoes, as your big toes are taking a beating from the shoes being too small or perhaps you need a wide shoe versus one that is narrow.  Just my thoughts on that.

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