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Q.

what does "larger than normal red blood cells" indicate?

My Docter said my recent bloodwork came back and showed that I have "larger than normal red blood cells" what can that indicate?

 

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A.
Large red blood cells aka Macrocytosis is a common effect caused by Vitamin B12/Folate deficiency anemia. 

Common causes are a vegan diet, because Vitamin B12 comes from foods from animal origin.  It's also commonly associated with those who have had bowel removes, bariatric surgery or Vitamin absorption disorders.  

Your doctor will most likely get more blood work to check for the above things. 

It can also be a side effect from medications, such as the antibiotic, Bactrim, Oral contraceptives and many others. 

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Megaloblastic Anemia is a blood disorder characterized by anemia in which the red blood cells are larger than normal. This conditin usually results from a deficiency of folic acid or vitiamin B.

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