My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Ask Your Question

WebMD Answers

120 Characters remaining
120 Characters remaining
  • First, try and keep your question as short as possible.
  • Include specific words that will help us identify questions that may already have your answer.
  • If you don't find your answer, you can post your question to WebMD Experts and Contributors.

Close

Posted: | Report This Report Question |
Q.

I get nosebleeds which sometimes end in taking out or swallow a strand of blood or something. Why is it?

When I refer to as "the strand" is usually the thing that ends the nosebleed but isn't limited to just one. It comes out covered in blood, but I do not know where it comes from though when I pull it out it feels kind of like it comes from my brain or something. There have been times where I pull out more than 2 simply because the bleeding wouldn't stop. Please remember that it happens at the end of nosebleeds so it is not like I can just pull it out ike a booger or something. 

Related Topics: Swallow, Brain
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

General Medicine
Nursing
1,202 Answers
15,211 Helpful Votes
192 Followers
A.
The strand you're referring to likely is a blood clot. In order to stop your nosebleed, the body sends out a mixture of chemicals that cause the blood to clot. This clot can look like a sticky, bloody strand. And, yes, it can feel like it's coming from your brain if you're pulling on a clot that's lodged up in one of your sinus cavities.

I'd advise not pulling out the clots, if possible, because they are helping stop the nosebleed. Nosebleeds can be caused by dry air, overuse of decongestants, forceful nose blowing, and many other things. If your nosebleeds tend to occur during the winter, dry air likely is the cause. You might try using a room humidifier or warm water vaporizer at night. You also may treat a nosebleed by placing a bit of moisturizing ointment, such as plain KY Jelly, inside the nasal passage or by using an over-the-counter saline spray.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

Posted:
| Report This Report Answer

Was this helpful?

YesNo

Thanks for your feedback.

47 of 52 found this helpful

Answers from Contributors (1)

1 Answer
A.

I believe what you are referring to is a blood clot that forms during a nose bleed. I get this as well when I have a nose bleed. Seems like to worst the nose bleed the bigger the blood clot.

 

Dave

 

The opinions expressed here are solely those of the User.down arrowThe opinions expressed here are solely those of the User.
User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice. Please see the
bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

Posted:
| Report This Report Answer

Was this helpful?

YesNo

Thanks for your feedback.