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Q.

Can a sudden jolt to the spine cause lumbar spinal stenosis?

I was sent to an I.M.E, by L & I. During the exam, just before the doctor removed his hand from the top of my head he thrust his hand down, while it was still on my head. (He used my head like a stapler).I immediately felt a sharp, intense pain in my lower back and right hip with shooting pain down my leg. I had an MRI on Friday and I was diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis. Since I have never had back/hip problems could the sudden, painful jolt to my spine cause the spinal stenosis?

 
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The maneuver your Dr. did is called the Spurlings Compression test, which tests for pinched nerves in the neck.    There is no chance that it could ever cause spinal stenosis.
Spinal stenosis is a bony growth that takes years and years to develop.   I can almost guarentee that you have had this for many years.   Many people find out they have this as an accidental finding when looking for something else.   Many don't have any symptoms, nor will they ever, it all depends on the location of the stenosis.  standing for long periods of time over years and years, coupled with obesity, are very common causes.   A

So in short, the spurlings compression test, cannot cause spinal stenosis. 

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