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Q.

Can my urine be red like blood after eating beets or should I go to the doctor?

 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

Primary Care
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A.

Yep, eating a lot of lot of beets can turn your urine red. Shocking, huh?  If you stop eating them, your urine should return to a normal color again. If not, or if you are having any signs of a urinary tract problem/infection, then seeing your medical provider would be appropriate.

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A.
If you eat quite a view beets, your urine it will have a red, dark orange color, especially if you are drinking beet juice,  your urine will get very red/dark orange, in some cases brownish in color.  The intensity of color, of course, is due to your water intact, other foods/liquids like coffee, carrots etc..

The color change lasts about a day or two, depending on your water intake and the amount of beets you ate.  If it is much longer after you had beets I would go to your doctor.

Oh, I love beets, and a lot of carrots can also cause a similar effect.

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