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Q.

I am 45, had tubal ligation 15 years ago and am 2 months late, could I be pregnant?

My mother did not go in to menopause until her 60s. I have been under a lot of stress for the past two years. Stopped taking all medication about 6 months ago (HBP, antidepressant, antipsychotic, and one for headaches). My periods are irregular only in that they are heavy and painful and a few days off. (not weeks or months). I am scheduled for Novasure procedure next week. If I am pregnant it would most likely be ectopic, right?

 

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A.
Tubal ligation is a sterilization procedure that renders you unable to get pregnant. In tubal ligation, the Fallopian tubes are cut or blocked, which makes it impossible for a sperm to reach an egg or for an egg to reach the uterus. Since you had a tubal ligation procedure, it's not likely you're pregnant.

That said, you should call your health care provider's office before the Novasure procedure to let them know your period is late. They will be able to advise you regarding what steps to take (such as whether or not they want you to take a pregnancy test).

On a broader note, I wanted to say I hope you did not discontinue your medications without the supervision of a health care provider. Conditions like high blood pressure often don't clear up on their own. If you still have blood pressure or depression issues, you would be well-advised to obtain medical treatment to ensure your health and well-being.

Best of luck to you!

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It is possible to get pregnant after a tubal ligation. Especially if you had the TL during a c-section. The fail rate for a tubal ligation is around 1 percent but goes up after ten years or if you had the TL during a c-section. Sometimes the tubes reattach themselves or a fistula forms. Although tubal pregnancy rates are higher if you had a TL  than if you didn't have the ligation,it is not "more likely" that you will have a tubal pregnancy than a successful one.

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If you are pregnant, it would NOT "MOST likely be ectopic."  It's simply MORE Likely than if you had not had a tubal ligation, but the odds are still in your favor.  I believe the chances of a woman without a tubal ligation, has a 1 in 400 chance of an ectopic pregnancy but now you might have a 1 in 100 chance.  So the odds are still quite in your favor but technically, you're "4 times more likely than you were, before" the tubal ligation. Make sense? 


If you had clips put on your fallopian tubes, they can fall off. And ties can break. But it's rare. 

My guess is you are either entering menopause, which is not a linear process for most of us. We stop our periods, they come again, and get off and on until finally they don't return.

OR your body is reacting to the medication changes. Our bodies are more sensitive than we realize. When we moved, and I was about 40, my body stopped having periods for nearly 7 months.  Then they suddenly  resumed and never missed one since...

Now I'm 52 and I'm still having my periods, regularly.  

If I were you, I'd let myself wonder about pregnancy. But I'd think it's probably the third most likely possibility. (And an ectopic pregnancy will be looked at quickly.)  Still, missing that many months of your period, if you are not having mood swings or hot flashes, would get me to call my doctor just to check things out.  GOOD LUCK!

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I have a friend and she had her tube tied for 17yrs. She got pregnant and couldn't belive it. Neither could I, her tube came untied. So yes you could be pregnant. You could be going through mood swing and hot flases and still be pregnant. No one do not know your body, who are they to judge, only God and Mother Nature know best. Good Luck!

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