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Q.

can migraines be seasonal

I'm 47 & for 2 Octobers in a row I've had Migraines.  They come 4 a week or so then go away.  They are so bad that I've to go see my doc for a shot.  In addition my daughter who is now 17 has been having migraines for about 5 years and i noticed that they seem to be more predominate in the fall.  If this is the case what can we do help prevent.  This seasonal theory just came to me yesterday when i was at the doc's getting a shot and I asked when my last one was Oct 22 and yesterday was Oct 17.

 

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Medical Editor, WebMD
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A.

Migraines, similar to other health conditions can be influenced by weather. Studies have shown that humidity, temperature change and barometric pressure changes can cause headache symptoms to get worse.

Additionally, stress and lack of good sleep can provoke headaches. Certainly, October with the holidays approaching can be a stressful time for many people.

 

Although weather can't be controlled, you can try to prevent headaches by taking care of yourself with rest, reducing stress and exercise. Enough sleep has been proven to be beneficial in prevention of headaches. Remember to eat well also and exercise regularly. Exercise releases endorphins (feel good chemicals) and it has been shown to be beneficial in prevention of migraines.

 

Migraines can be very difficult on you and your family. But taking care of yourself by exercising , eating well and sleeping could help prevent them.

 

 If you are having migraines frequently or are concerned be sure to speak to your doctor.

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A.
I read that migraines can be seasonal, but it is better described that you may suffer migraines more in a particular season.

Environmental factors that can trigger a migraine include a change in climate or weather (such as a change in humidity or temperature), a change in altitude or barometric pressure, high winds, traveling, or a change in routine. 

Often seasons bring on a new set of stresses, as a parent my stress level went up during the fall because of my children going back to school, the change in routine etc. Your daughter might be having the same issue.

Also fall brings about different allergy triggers, what can be precieved as a migraine could be a sinus head-ache. 
Here is an interesting article about the sinus-migraine relationship:


Winter has it's set of stresses like the holidays, which is rumoured as being the most stressful times of the year, with the added change in weather, especially for those living in snow bound states.   

I hope you feel better!!


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I am a migraine sufferer and I can attest that my migraines are influenced by weather.  I live in Southern California in a region called the Inland Empire about 45 miles east of L.A.  Our weather here is very hot and dry during the summer with no rain or moisture.  Sometime around mid Oct to early Nov we get our first rain, or at least moist weather. I can always count on getting a migraine at that time.  Then we go through a rainy season between Nov and May.  When the rainy season ends, I can usually count on a migraine, usually around April or May, during the first heat wave of the year (about 85 degrees and above). Although, I get migraines sporadically throughout the year, Those definite weather changes are a constant in my own migraine frequency.

If the weather changes suddenly in anyway, I am usually affected, unless the weather is changing back and forth in shorter intervals.  During the summer when it is hot and dry for weeks at a time, then all of a sudden we have one day of humidity (which is rare in So So Cal but iot happens), I will get a migraine.

There is definietely a connection to the foods I eat as well.  I think foods with preservatives may have an affect but I haven't totally narrowed that one down as well as the weather constant.

Also,
 stress, combined with the factors mentioned above, will always worsen my migraines.

I hope this is of some help to other migraine sufferers.

-Lp

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