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I used Depo-Provera® for about three years for birth control. How concerned should I be about my bone density?

 

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A.

Depo-Provera® has been available for many years as a contraceptive injection given every three months. It provides a convenient birth control choice for many women. In 2004, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning that the use of Depo-Provera® may cause a loss of bone density. Bone loss is greater the longer a woman has used Depo-Provera®, and it may not be completely reversible.

In the case of teen girls and young women, it is not known if Depo-Provera® will reduce peak bone mass or increase the risk of osteoporosis and broken bones later in life. Peak bone mass is the point when a person has the greatest amount of bone she or he will ever have. A study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) found that bone density appears to recover in teen girls after they stop using Depo-Provera®. The results of this study were published in 2005. Other studies have had similar findings, but the effects on bones might be different in women who use Depo-Provera® for a long time, especially five or more years.

Because of concerns about its effect on bones, the FDA has advised that Depo-Provera® should not be used longer than two years if other forms of birth control are available and appropriate.

You may wonder when you should have a bone density test. That depends on your risk factors for osteoporosis. There are no guidelines suggesting routine bone density testing of premenopausal women. Bone density tests are usually only recommended for premenopausal women if they break several bones easily or break bones that are unusual for this age group. For example, breaking a hip or breaking a bone in the spine is unusual. Health care providers may also recommend a bone density test for young premenopausal women who need to take a glucocorticoid (steroid) medicine.

Young women with a major family history of osteoporosis or with other risk factors for osteoporosis may want to choose a different form of contraception.

Because of your past use of Depo-Provera®, bone healthy behaviors are especially important. Be sure to get your calcium and vitamin D every day and exercise regularly. If you smoke, give it up, and don’t drink too much alcohol.

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Read the Original Article: I used Depo-Provera® for about three years for birth control. How concerned should I be about my bone density?

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I'm on the depo shot to, I don't know exactly and I believe it depends on how much calcium and protein you take in while your on it. however if you didn't take that much in or are nervous i would talk to your doctor about it and see what they say.

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