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Q.

When is palliative care appropriate?

Related Topics: Palliative Therapy
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

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A.

If you've been diagnosed with a serious, long-lasting disease or with a life-threatening illness, palliative care can make your life -- and the lives of those who care for you -- much easier.

Palliative care can be performed along with the care you receive from your primary doctors.

With palliative care, there is a  focus on relieving pain and other troubling symptoms and meeting your emotional, spiritual, and practical needs. In short, this new medical specialty aims to improve your quality of life -- however you define that for yourself.

Your palliative care providers will work with you to identify and carry out your goals: symptom relief, counseling, spiritual comfort, or whatever enhances your quality of life. Palliative care can also help you to understand all of your treatment options.

Be assured that you may receive palliative care at the same time that you pursue a cure for your illness. You won't be required to give up your regular doctors or treatments or hope for a cure.

Palliative care may also be a good option if you have a serious disease that has prompted multiple hospitalizations or emergency room visits during the previous year.

If your family members also need help, palliative care can provide them emotional and spiritual support, educate them about your situation, and support them as caregivers.  Some palliative programs offer home support and assistance with shopping, meal preparation, and respite care to give caregivers time off.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Archived: March 20, 2014

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Read the Original Article: When Is Palliative Care Appropriate?