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Q.

What should I do if my MS treatment isn't working?

Related Topics: Multiple Sclerosis
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

8,020 Answers
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A.

Before you and your doctor take any steps to switch treatment, make sure you're taking your MS medication exactly as prescribed. "One of the most common causes of a poor response is simply not taking medications the right way," says Jack S. Burks, MD, chief medical officer of the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America.

Whatever you do, don't just stop taking medications because you think they're not working -- or because you think you don't need them. Talk with your doctor about your concerns.

Each class of MS medication works in different ways.  So be clear about what your MS medication is designed to do before deciding that it's not working. For example, disease modifying therapies (DMTs) slow MS progression. If you're also expecting them to control all your symptoms, you may be alarmed if that doesn't happen.

If side effects are more than you can stand, then something needs to change. If you're noticing serious changes in how well you're functioning or if you're having many more relapses than in the past, that's also a red flag.  Document and share these changes with your doctor.

By the same token, don't equate symptom control with overall disease control. Even if you feel pretty well, your doctor may recommend a change in treatment if more lesions are showing up on MRIs or if neurologic exams are worsening.

However, don't switch medications unless necessary, says Burks. That's because these drugs differ in how they work on inflammation and damage.

By putting your heads together and listening to each other, though, you and your doctor can decide if your medications are working well enough – and can develop the best course of action for you.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Archived: March 20, 2014

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Read the Original Article: Is Your MS Treatment Working?