My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Ask Your Question

WebMD Answers

120 Characters remaining
120 Characters remaining
  • First, try and keep your question as short as possible.
  • Include specific words that will help us identify questions that may already have your answer.
  • If you don't find your answer, you can post your question to WebMD Experts and Contributors.

Close

Posted: | Report This Report Question |
Q.

What are the emotional and physical feelings associated with lupus?

Related Topics: Lupus
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

8,020 Answers
289,737 Helpful Votes
339 Followers
A.

The feelings associated with lupus can have multiple causes, including:

Outward effects of the disease or its treatment. Visible problems such as a facial rash or weight gain from corticosteroids used to treat lupus can affect your physical appearance and self-esteem.

Work and activity limitations. Pain, fatigue, and other symptoms can make it difficult to do things you once enjoyed. The disease or its treatment may make it necessary to cut back at work or even leave your job completely. This can affect the pleasure you get from your job, your sense of purpose, and even your income.

Pain, fatigue, and other physical symptoms. Simply living with pain and other symptoms every day can wear you down. Emotionally, this can lead to frustration and feelings of hopelessness.

Social isolation. When you feel bad or use all of your energy just to get through the day, social activities may be among the first things to go. Concerns about changes in your appearance may also cause you to withdraw.

Uncertainty about the future. Having a chronic, unpredictable disease can cause uncertainty and anxiety. You may wonder how the disease will progress, whether you will be able to stay independent, or how you will manage physically and financially.

Difficulty with family relationships. Having a chronic illness like lupus may make it difficult to take care of your home or family the way you would like to or feel you should. Because the disease may come and go and often shows no outward signs, your family may not understand why you can’t do the things you used to do. They may even question whether your disease is all in your head.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

Posted:
| Report This Report Answer
Archived: March 20, 2014

Was this helpful?

YesNo

Thanks for your feedback.

36 of 36 found this helpful
Read the Original Article: Lupus and Mental Health Concerns