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Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

Internal Medicine
Emory University
131 Answers
51,069 Helpful Votes
47 Followers
A.

“Lesion” is a general word for a tissue abnormality. Liver lesion is a term doctors use for abnormal areas noted on an imaging test of the liver. Most often, liver lesions are seen on an ultrasound, computed tomogram (CT) scan, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan.

The term “liver lesion” is a general term. Liver lesions could be anything from harmless cysts in the liver, to areas of cancer spreading from the colon or breast. The appearance of the lesions on imaging, as well as other diagnoses and test results, can often help explain the cause of liver lesions.

When the nature of liver lesions is unclear, and a diagnosis such as cancer is possible, a biopsy is often needed to determine their cause.

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I recently had to have a chest x-ray looking for lung lesions, which I was told were mostly malignant.  The test was ordered due to the sodium levels in my blood and urine were different and also because I am a long term smoker and have chronic bronchitis. That was all I was told.  I am curious as to what type of lesions these could be and how bad it is.

 

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