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Q.

I have skin tags in both underarm areas. How many skin tags can typically be removed in one office visit?

Related Topics: Armpit, Skin
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

Dermatology
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgery and Skin Care
273 Answers
2,727 Helpful Votes
38 Followers
A.

Skin tags are common, acquired, benign skin growths that look like a small piece of soft, hanging skin. Skin tags are harmless growths. Some individuals may be more prone to tags -- between 50-100 tags. Males and females are equally prone to developing skin tags. Obesity and being moderately overweight (even temporary increases) dramatically increase the chances of having skin tags. Normal-weight individuals with larger breasts are also more prone to skin tags under their breasts.

Some small tags spontaneously rub or fall off painlessly and the person may not even know they had a skin tag. Most tags do not fall off on their own and stay around once formed. The medical name for a skin tag is acrochordon, or fibroepithelial polyp.

Skin tags can occur almost anywhere on the body where there is skin. However, the top two favorite areas for skin tags are the neck and armpits. Other areas include the eyelids, upper chest (particularly under the female breasts), buttock folds, and groin folds. Tags are typically thought to occur in high-friction locations, where skin rubs against skin or clothing most often.

In general, there is no limit to the number of skin tags that can be removed at one office visit, as long as your overall health permits the in-office procedure.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Read the Original Article: Fabulous Tips for Your 40s: Ask the Dermatologist
 
 

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