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Q.

What is the treatment for tennis elbow?

Related Topics: Tennis Elbow
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

8,020 Answers
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A.

The good news about treatment is that usually tennis elbow will heal on its own. You just need to give your elbow a break and do what you can to speed the healing. Types of treatment that help are:

  • Icing the elbow to reduce pain and swelling. Experts recommend doing it every 20 to 30 minutes every three to four hours for two to three days or until the pain is gone.
  • Using an elbow strap to protect the injured tendon from further strain.
  • Taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, naproxen, or aspirin, to help with pain and swelling. However, these drugs can cause side effects, such as bleeding and ulcers. You should only use them occasionally, unless your doctor says otherwise.
  • Performing range of motion exercises to reduce stiffness and increase flexibility. Your doctor may recommend that you do them three to five times a day.
  • Getting physical therapy to strengthen and stretch the muscles.
  • Having injections of steroids or painkillers to temporarily ease some of the swelling and pain around the joint. Studies suggest that steroid injections don't help in the long term.

Most of the time, these treatments will do the trick. But if you have a severe case of tennis elbow that doesn't respond to two to four months of conservative treatment, you may need surgery. In the procedure, the damaged section of tendon usually is removed and the remaining tendon repaired. About 50% of people with tennis elbow eventually need this treatment. Surgery is estimated to work in 85% to 90% of cases.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Archived: March 20, 2014

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Read the Original Article: Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)