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Q.

What do the different urine colors mean?

Related Topics: Urination
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

Urinary Incontinence
University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine
20 Answers
1,718 Helpful Votes
12 Followers
A.

... Normal urine can range in color from pale yellow (almost colorless) to deep amber. Dark amber urine is usually very concentrated and means that you should be drinking more water. Foods, medications and even vitamins can change the color of urine temporarily but eliminating the cause brings the color back to normal. Most changes in urine color are harmless and the color will go back to normal within a day or two.

Some colors require more attention:

A reddish tinge can mean that blood is present in the urine—or it can mean that you just ate beets or blackberries (urine color tends to turn purplish red afterwards.) If the reddish tinge continues over several days, after you've eliminated foods that may be causing the color, you should mention it to your primary care provider.

Greenish urine can mean that you have a urinary tract infection but if it's bright green, it can mean that you have too much of B vitamins. Certain drugs and some health conditions can cause urine to turn green, too, so mention this to your health care professional.

Urine with a bluish tint can mean some type of bacterial infection or may just mean that you have a high level of calcium. If this persists, give your health care professional a call.

Brown urine can indicate a potentially serious condition and you should contact your doctor's office for help. Sometimes laxatives can temporarily turn urine brown but if this dark color stays, get it checked out.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Read the Original Article: Urine Color