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Q.

What can I do to treat Sinusitis at home?

Related Topics: Sinus Infection
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

Medical Reference
A.

Home treatment may relieve symptoms of pain and pressure associated with short-term (acute) sinusitis. Home treatment may improve drainage of mucus from the sinuses and prevent the need for antibiotics. There is no scientific evidence to support the use of home treatments in sinusitis, but you may find one or more of them helpful.

  • Drink plenty of fluids to help keep your mucus thin.
  • Apply moist heat (using a hot, damp towel or gel pack) to your face for 5 to 10 minutes, several times a day.
  • Breathe warm, moist air from a steamy shower, a hot bath, or a sink filled with hot water. Avoid extremely cool, dry air. Consider using a humidifier to increase the moisture in the air in your home.
  • Use saltwater nasal washes (saline lavage or irrigation) to help keep the nasal passages open and wash out mucus and bacteria. You can purchase saline nose drops at a pharmacy or make your own saline solution at home. It may also help to gargle with warm salt water by using one teaspoon of salt per pint of water.
  • Use nonprescription medications such as pain relievers and decongestants (for example, nasal spray) to relieve symptoms. Do not give cough and cold medicines to a child younger than 2 unless your child’s doctor has told you to. If your child’s doctor tells you to give a medicine, be sure to follow what he or she tells you to do. Be careful when using some nasal-spray decongestants. They usually should not be used for more than about 3 days. Longer use can lead to further swelling of the sinus membranes after the medicine wears off (called rebound congestion), which makes pressure and swelling worse. You may end up dependent on the medicine if you start using more and more of it to get rid of the pressure and swelling.
  • If you need to blow your nose, do it gently. Forceful blowing may force thick mucus back into your sinuses and block them. Keep both nostrils open when blowing your nose.

If you have chronic sinusitis, you'll probably need to continue the above home treatment measures for a long period of time to keep your sinuses clear.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Read the Original Article: Sinusitis-Home Treatment
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