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Q.

What are the symptoms of Retinal Detachment?

Related Topics: Detached Retina
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

Medical Reference
A.

Most cases of retinal detachment begin when the vitreous gel that fills the center of the eye shrinks and separates from the retina (called posterior vitreous detachment, or PVD). Symptoms of PVD include:

  • Floaters in your field of vision. Floaters are thick strands or clumps of solid vitreous gel that develop as the gel ages and breaks down. Floaters often appear as dark specks, globs, strings, or dots. Floaters may also be caused by loose blood or pigment from retina tears.
  • Flashes of light or sparks when you move your eyes or head. These are easier to see against a dark background. The brief flashes occur when the vitreous gel tugs on the retina (vitreous traction). These flashes usually appear at the edge of your visual field.

Although an occasional floater is normal, floaters and flashes may be warning signs of retinal detachment. A sudden shower of what appear to be hundreds or thousands of little black dots across the field of vision is a distinctive sign of blood and/or pigment in the vitreous gel and may indicate a retinal detachment. This requires immediate medical attention.

Having floaters or flashes does not always mean that you are about to have a retinal detachment, but you should not ignore these symptoms. Call your doctor to discuss whether you need to have an eye exam. If you have a PVD, your doctor needs to examine your retina to determine your risk for a retinal tear or detachment, if one has not already occurred. If you have a retinal tear, early treatment may prevent a retinal detachment.

Rarely, a retinal detachment can occur without warning. The first signs may be:

  • A shadow or curtain effect across part of your visual field that does not go away. Because detachments usually affect peripheral (side) vision first, you may not notice a problem until the detachment has gotten bigger.
  • New or sudden vision loss. Vision loss caused by retinal detachment tends to get worse over time. Sudden vision loss is a medical emergency.

If you have new or sudden flashes or floaters, darkness over part of your visual field, or a new loss of vision that does not go away, call your eye doctor or regular doctor right away.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Read the Original Article: Retinal Detachment-Symptoms
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