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Q.

I have or think I have Kidney Stones, when should I contact my doctor?

Related Topics: Kidney Stone
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

Medical Reference
A.

Call a doctor immediately if you have symptoms that suggest you have a kidney stone, such as:

  • Severe pain in your side, abdomen, groin, or genitals. It may get worse in waves.
  • Blood in your urine.
  • Signs of a urinary tract infection.

Call your doctor if you have been diagnosed with a kidney stone and have another problem, such as:

  • Severe nausea or vomiting.
  • Fever and chills.
  • Severe pain in your side in the area of your kidney (flank pain).

Call your doctor to determine if you need an exam when you:

  • Have been diagnosed with a kidney stone, and you need a stronger pain medicine.
  • Pass a stone, even if there was little or no pain. Save the stone, and ask your doctor whether it should be tested.

Watchful Waiting

Watchful waiting is a wait-and-see approach. If you get better on your own, you won't need medical treatment. If you get worse, you and your doctor will decide what to do next.

If you are passing a kidney stone under your doctor's advice, you may be able to pass the stone without medical treatment if you:

  • Can control your pain with medicine.
  • Know how to look for and collect kidney stones you pass.
  • Do not have signs of infection, such as fever and chills.
  • Are able to drink plenty of fluids.
  • Do not have severe nausea or vomiting.

Who To See

If you need immediate help because of pain from kidney stones, you may see an emergency medicine specialist.

Health professionals who can diagnose and treat nonurgent kidney stones include:

To prepare for your appointment, see the topic Making the Most of Your Appointment.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Read the Original Article: Kidney Stones-When To Call a Doctor
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Answers from Contributors (1)