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Q.

How do I know that my lymph nodes are swollen?

Related Topics: Lymph Node, Swelling
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

8,021 Answers
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A.

Normally you shouldn't be able to feel your lymph nodes. They measure only about a half-inch across. When you get sick they can swell -- sometimes to two to three times their usual size -- to the point where you can distinctly feel them.

Other symptoms of swollen glands include:

    * Tenderness or pain when you press on them.
    * Symptoms of the underlying infection (fever, sore throat, mouth sore).
    * Red, warm, swollen skin over the lymph node.
    * Lump.

Swollen lymph nodes that are softer, tender, and move easily are usually a sign of infection or inflammation. A hard lymph node that does not move and does not cause pain needs further evaluation by your doctor.

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Archived: March 20, 2014

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Read the Original Article: Swollen Glands

Answers from Contributors (2)

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A.

i have sorness to the touch on my right side about 2" below the armpit.  I do not feel any lumps.  The tenderness comes and goes. when I touch the area it feels like it is along the upper part of my rib cage. 

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