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Q.

Can caffeine and soda affect bone health?

Related Topics: Caffeine, Soda
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (2)

Nutrition
Peeke Performance Center
71 Answers
1,771 Helpful Votes
31 Followers
A.
I'll bet you didn't know that caffeine leaches calcium from your body. Three cups of coffee remove 45 mg of calcium. Top that with what soda does. It's not only got a load of caffeine but phosphoric acid, which blocks the absorption of calcium. And finally, watch out not to be eating too much protein. Yep, it also causes the body to lose calcium. Once again, think of moderation when you reach for that cup of Joe or soda or protein. Heads up and protect those bones!

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Read the Original Article: Watch the caffeine if you want strong bones.
Fitness
Health Coach, WebMD
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A.

Studies have shown that soda drinkers are more at risk for breaking or fracturing their bones and for developing osteoporosis. More research, however, is needed to better understand what specifically is influencing this relationship. There are three main ideas for why this occurs: the caffeine in soda, the amount of phosphoric acid in soda, or simply because soda is taking the place of healthier alternatives.

Calcium impacts bone mass and prevents bone loss, but caffeine has been shown to interfere with calcium absorption, though its affects may be minimal. Phosphoric acid, often found in soda, works with calcium in controlling bone health, but excess consumption has been linked to lower bone density in studies.

Soda may affect bone health simply because soda drinkers are likely to not be consuming as much of other nutritious alternatives. So, negative bone health may result from soda itself or it may be because of a lack of other healthier beverages like milk. More research needs to be done in order to better understand the relationship between soda and bone health.

This article provides some good information on the subject: http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/features/soda-osteoporosis.

 

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Answers from Contributors (1)

47 Answers
8 Helpful Votes
A.
There are mixed reports, whether caffeine and soda intake affects bone health. It is generally speculated that too much phosphorus (from phosphoric acid in cola drinks) or too much caffeine could weaken bones by resorption of calcium from bones or blocking calcium absorption. One should avoid these beverages as they contain high sugar and phosphate. Replacing milk and other healthy foods with diet cola, sodas or caffeine containing products have negative effect on bone health.

Tips - Intake of calcium rich stuff, vitamins and proteins and physical exercise, plays important role in determining bone health.

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