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Q.

What is the recommended dosage for Zinc?

Related Topics: Zinc
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

Medical Reference
A.
The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
  • For treating the common cold: one zinc gluconate or acetate lozenge, providing 9-24 mg elemental zinc, dissolved in the mouth every two hours while awake when cold symptoms are present.
  • For diarrhea in malnourished or zinc-deficient children: 10-40 mg elemental zinc daily.
  • For preventing and treating pneumonia in undernourished children in developing countries: 10-70 mg/day.
  • For hypogeusia (sense of taste is abnormal): 25-100 mg zinc.
  • For the eating disorder anorexia nervosa: 100 mg of zinc gluconate daily.
  • For treating stomach ulcers: zinc sulfate 200 mg three times daily.
  • For muscle cramps in zinc deficient people with liver disease: zinc sulfate 220 mg twice daily.
  • For osteoporosis: 15 mg zinc combined with 5 mg manganese, 1000 mg calcium, and 2.5 mg copper has been used.
  • For sickle cell disease: zinc sulfate 220 mg three times daily.
  • To increase growth and weight gain in children with sickle cell disease who have not reached puberty: 10 mg elemental zinc per day.
  • For treating attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children: doses of zinc sulfate 55 mg (15 mg elemental zinc) to 150 mg (40 mg elemental zinc) daily.
  • For treating acne: 30-135 mg elemental zinc daily.
  • For treating age-related macular degeneration (AMD): elemental zinc 80 mg plus vitamin C 500 mg, vitamin E 400 IU, and beta-carotene 15 mg daily.
The National Institute of Medicine has established Adequate Intake (AI) levels of zinc for infants birth to 6 months is 2 mg/day. For older infants, children, and adults, Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) quantities of zinc have been established: infants and children 7 months to 3 years, 3 mg/day; 4 to 8 years, 5 mg/day; 9 to 13 years, 8 mg/day; girls 14 to 18 years, 9 mg/day; boys and men age 14 and older, 11 mg/day; women 19 and older, 8 mg/day; pregnant women 14 to 18, 13 mg/day; pregnant women 19 and older, 11 mg/day; lactating women 14 to 18, 14 mg/day; lactating women 19 and older, 12 mg/day.

The typical North American male consumes about 13 mg/day of dietary zinc; women consume approximately 9 mg/day.

The Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (UL) of zinc for people who are not receiving zinc under medical supervision: Infants birth to 6 months, 4 mg/day; 7 to 12 months, 5 mg/day; children 1 to 3 years, 7 mg/day; 4 to 8 years, 12 mg/day; 9 to 13 years, 23 mg/day; 14 to 18 years (including pregnancy and lactation), 34 mg/day; adults 19 years and older (including pregnancy and lactation), 40 mg/day.

Different salt forms provide different amounts of elemental zinc. Zinc sulfate contains 23% elemental zinc; 220 mg zinc sulfate contains 50 mg zinc. Zinc gluconate contains 14.3% elemental zinc; 10 mg zinc gluconate contains 1.43 mg zinc.

APPLIED TO THE SKIN:
  • For acne vulgaris: zinc acetate 1.2% with erythromycin 4% as a lotion applied twice daily.
  • For herpes simplex infections: zinc sulfate 0.25% applied 8 to 10 times daily or zinc oxide 0.3% with glycine applied every 2 hours while awake.

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Read the Original Article: More on ZINC including: uses, side effects, interactions, dosages, and user reveiws.
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