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Q.

What is Thiamine (vitamin B1) used to treat?

 

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Medical Reference
A.
Thiamine (vitamin B1) is effective for:
  • Treatment and prevention of thiamine deficiency, including a specific disorder called Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) that is related to low levels of thiamine (thiamine deficiency) and is often see in alcoholics. Between 30% and 80% of alcoholics are believed to have thiamine deficiency. Giving thiamine shots seems to help decrease the risk of developing WKS and decrease symptoms of WKS during alcohol withdrawal.
  • Correcting problems in people with certain types of genetic diseases including Leigh's disease, maple syrup urine disease, and others.


Thiamine (vitamin B1) is possibly effective for:
  • Preventing kidney disease in people with type 2 diabetes. Developing research shows that taking high-dose thiamine (100 mg three times daily) for three months significantly decreases the amount of albumin in the urine in people with type 2 diabetes. Albumin in the urine is an indication of kidney damage.
  • Preventing cataracts.


Thiamine (vitamin B1) has insufficient evidence for:
  • Preventing cervical cancer. Some research suggests that increasing intake of riboflavin from dietary and supplement sources, along with other folic acid, riboflavin, and vitamin B12, might decrease the risk of precancerous spots on the cervix.
  • Improving athletic performance.
  • Poor appetite.
  • Ulcerative colitis.
  • Chronic diarrhea.
  • Stomach problems.
  • Brain conditions.
  • AIDS.
  • Heart disease.
  • Alcoholism.
  • Stress.
  • Aging.
  • Canker sores.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of thiamine for these uses.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Read the Original Article: More on THIAMINE (VITAMIN B1) including: uses, side effects, interactions, dosages, and user reveiws.
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