My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Ask Your Question

WebMD Answers

120 Characters remaining
120 Characters remaining
  • First, try and keep your question as short as possible.
  • Include specific words that will help us identify questions that may already have your answer.
  • If you don't find your answer, you can post your question to WebMD Experts and Contributors.

Close

Posted: | Report This Report Question |
Q.

What is the recommended dosage for Niacin And Niacinamide (vitamin B3)?

Related Topics: Niacin, Vitamin
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

Medical Reference
A.
The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
  • For high cholesterol: The effects of niacin are dose-dependent. The biggest increases in HDL and decreases in triglycerides occur at 1200-1500 mg/day. Niacin’s greatest effects on LDL occur at 2000-3000 mg/day.
  • To prevent heart disease in people with high cholesterol: Niacin 4 grams daily.
  • For preventing and treating vitamin B3 deficiency: Doses of nicotinic acid and niacinamide are considered equivalent. For mild vitamin B3 deficiency, niacin or niacinamide 50-100 mg per day is used. For pellagra in adults, niacin or niacinamide 300-500 mg daily is given in divided doses. For pellagra in children, niacin or niacinamide 100-300 mg daily is given in divided doses. For Hartnup disease, niacin or niacinamide 50-200 mg daily.
  • For reducing fluid loss caused by cholera toxin: Niacin 2 grams daily.
  • To prevent type 1 diabetes in high-risk children: Sustained-release niacinamide 1.2 grams/m2 (body surface area) per day.
  • To slow disease progression of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes: Niacinamide 25 mg/kg daily.
  • For treating osteoarthritis: Niacinamide 3 grams per day in divided doses.
  • For reduced risk of cataracts: A daily dietary intake of approximately 44 mg of niacin.
  • For preventing Alzheimer’s disease: 17-45 mg of niacin from food and multivitamins. Food sources high in niacin include meat, fish, beans, nuts, coffee, and fortified grains and cereals. Note that there is no reliable evidence that taking a stand-alone niacin supplement will help to prevent Alzheimer’s disease.
The daily recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) of niacin are: Infants 0-6 months, 2 mg; Infants 7-12 months, 4 mg; Children 1-3 years, 6 mg; Children 4-8 years, 8 mg; Children 9-13 years, 12 mg; Men 14 years and older, 16 mg; Women 14 years and older, 14 mg; Pregnant women, 18 mg; and Lactating women, 17 mg. The maximum daily dose of niacin is: Children 1-3 years, 10 mg; Children 4-8 years, 15 mg; Children 9-13 years, 20 mg; Adults, including Pregnant and Lactating women, 14-18 years, 30 mg; and Adults, including pregnant and breast-feeding women, older than 18 years, 35 mg.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

Posted:
| Report This Report Answer

Was this helpful?

YesNo

Thanks for your feedback.

53 of 57 found this helpful
Read the Original Article: More on NIACIN AND NIACINAMIDE (VITAMIN B3) including: uses, side effects, interactions, dosages, and user reveiws.
View Sources