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Q.

How does the brain perceive pain with fibromyalgia?

Related Topics: Fibromyalgia, Brain, Pain
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

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A.

There are roughly 20 different kinds of nerve endings in your skin that tell you if something is hot, cold, or painful.

These nerve endings convert mechanical, thermal, or chemical energy into electrical signals that convey information to the brain and spinal cord -- also known as the central nervous system or CNS.

These signals travel to areas of your CNS where you perceive the stimuli as the painful sensations you actually feel -- sensations such as searing, burning, pounding, or throbbing.

Research suggests that the pain associated with fibromyalgia is caused by a "glitch" in the way the body processes pain. This glitch results in a hypersensitivity to stimuli that normally are not painful.

According to the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, research has shown that people with fibromyalgia have reduced blood flow to parts of the brain that normally help the body deal with pain.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Archived: March 20, 2014

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Read the Original Article: Fibromyalgia Pain