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Q.

How is hypothyroidism treated?

Related Topics: Hypothyroidism
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

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A.

Doctors usually prescribe thyroid hormone pills to treat hypothyroidism.

Most people start to feel better within a week or two. Your symptoms will probably go away within a few months. But you will likely need to keep taking the pills permanently.

It's important to take your medicine just the way your doctor tells you to. You will also need to see your doctor for follow-up visits to make sure you have the right dose. Getting too much or too little thyroid hormone can cause problems.

If you have mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism, you may not need treatment now. But you'll want to watch closely for signs that it is getting worse.

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Archived: March 20, 2014

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Read the Original Article: Fatigued or Full Throttle: Is Your Thyroid to Blame?

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A.
I have hypothyroidism.  Been treated for 25 years,  my tsh is .09.  My Dr. has lowered the synthroid dosage.  I don't understand why the med is lower dosage instead of higher.

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