My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Ask Your Question

WebMD Answers

120 Characters remaining
120 Characters remaining
  • First, try and keep your question as short as possible.
  • Include specific words that will help us identify questions that may already have your answer.
  • If you don't find your answer, you can post your question to WebMD Experts and Contributors.

Close

Posted: | Report This Report Question |
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

8,020 Answers
254,953 Helpful Votes
307 Followers
A.

Anal cancer is an uncommon malignancy that starts in the anus -- the opening at the end of the rectum.

The American Cancer Society estimates that just 6230 new cases of anal cancer are expected to occur in 2012 in the U.S. with just 780 expected deaths.

By way of contrast, more than 40,290 new cases of rectal cancer are projected for 2012.

Approximately half of all anal cancers are diagnosed before the malignancy has spread beyond the primary site, whereas 13% to 25% are diagnosed after the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes, and 10% are diagnosed after the cancer has spread to distant organs, that is metastasized.

When it is found early, anal cancer is highly treatable.

The overall five-year survival rate following diagnosis of anal cancer is 60% for men and 71% for women.

When the cancer is diagnosed in its earliest stage, five-year survival rate is 82%. Once the cancer has spread to surrounding lymph nodes, the five-year survival drops to 60%. If the cancer has spread to distant organs, about one in five patients lives for five years or more.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

Posted:
| Report This Report Answer
Archived: March 20, 2014

Was this helpful?

YesNo

Thanks for your feedback.

167 of 210 found this helpful
Read the Original Article: What Is Anal Cancer?