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Q.

Is hip replacement surgery safe?

Related Topics: Surgery
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

8,020 Answers
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A.

Hip replacements surgery has been performed for years and surgical techniques are being improved all the time. As with any surgery, however, there are risks. Since you will not be able to move around much at first, blood clots are a particular concern. Your doctor will give you blood thinners to help prevent blood clots from occurring. Infection and bleeding are also possible, as are risks associated with using general anesthesia.

Other, less common concerns that you and your doctor must watch out for are:


  • Your legs may not be of equal length after the surgery.

  • You must be careful not to cross your legs or not to sit too low because
    the joint may be dislocated.

  • Pieces of fat in the bone marrow may become loose, enter the bloodstream
    and get into the lungs, which can cause very serious breathing problems.

  • Nerves in the hip area may be injured from swelling or pressure and can
    cause some numbness.

  • Other bones may be broken during the surgery, which may require a longer
    hospital stay.

  • The replacement parts may become loose or break. (This occurs rarely and
    takes years to develop.)

  • The spinal anesthesia may not numb the area completely and you may feel
    some discomfort after surgery.



Talk to your surgeon about these risks before undergoing the procedure.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Archived: March 20, 2014

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Read the Original Article: Arthritis and Hip Replacement Surgery