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Q.

Who Would Take Care of the Person with Alzheimer's disease if Something Happened to You?

Related Topics: Alzheimer's Disease
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

1,216 Answers
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A.

It is important to have a plan in case of your own illness, disability, or death.

  • Consult a lawyer about setting up a living trust, durable power of attorney for health care and finances, and other estate planning tools.
  • Consult with family and close friends to decide who will take responsibility for the person with Alzheimer's. You also may want to seek information about your local public guardian's office, mental health conservator's office, adult protective services, or other case management services. These organizations may have programs to assist the person with Alzheimer's in your absence.
  • Maintain a notebook for the responsible person who will assume caregiving. Such a notebook should contain the following information:
  • emergency phone numbers
  • current problem behaviors and possible solutions
  • ways to calm the person with Alzheimer's
  • assistance needed with toileting, feeding, or grooming
  • favorite activities or food

Preview board and care or long-term care facilities in your community and select a few as possibilities. Share this information with the responsible person. If the person with Alzheimer's disease is no longer able to live at home, the responsible person will be better able to carry out your wishes for long-term care.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Read the Original Article: Alzheimer's Disease: Home Safety Information