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Q.

What causes red tongue or strawberry tongue?

Related Topics: Tongue, Strawberry Tongue
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

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A.

There are multiple factors that can cause a normally pink tongue to turn red. In some instances, the tongue may even take on the appearance of a strawberry with enlarged, red taste buds dotting the surface. Possible causes include:

  • Vitamin deficiencies. Deficiencies of folic acid and vitamin B-12 may cause your tongue to take on a reddish appearance.
  • Geographic tongue. This condition, also known as benign migratory glossitis, is named for the map-like pattern of reddish spots that develop on the surface of the tongue. At times, these patches have a white border around them, and their location on the tongue may shift over time. Though usually harmless, you should check with your doctor to investigate red patches that last longer than two weeks. Once your doctor has determined that the redness is a result of geographic tongue, no further treatment is necessary. If the condition makes your tongue sore or uncomfortable, you may be prescribed topical medications to alleviate discomfort.
  • Scarlet fever. People suffering from this streptococcal infection may develop a strawberry tongue. Be sure to contact a doctor immediately if you have a high fever and red tongue. Antibiotic treatment is necessary for scarlet fever.
  • Kawasaki syndrome. This disease, usually seen in children under the age of five, affects the blood vessels in the body and can cause strawberry tongue. During the acute phase of illness, children often run an extremely high fever and may also have redness and swelling in the hands and feet.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Archived: March 20, 2014

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Read the Original Article: Tongue Problem Basics: Sore or Discolored Tongue and Tongue Bumps