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Q.

How can you tell if someone has an alcohol problem?

 

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A.

Answering the following four questions can help you find out if you or a loved one has a drinking problem:

  • Have you ever felt you should cut down on your drinking?
  • Have people annoyed you by criticizing your drinking?
  • Have you ever felt bad or guilty about your drinking?
  • Have you ever had a drink first thing in the morning to steady your nerves or to get rid of a hangover?

One "yes" answer suggests a possible alcohol problem. More than one "yes" answer means it is highly likely that a problem exists. If you think that you or someone you know might have an alcohol problem, it is important to see a doctor or other health care provider right away. They can help you determine if a drinking problem exists and plan the best course of action.

Can a problem drinker simply cut down?

It depends. If that person has been diagnosed as an alcoholic, the answer is "no." Alcoholics who try to cut down on drinking rarely succeed. Cutting out alcohol -- that is, abstaining -- is usually the best course for recovery. People who are not alcohol dependent but who have experienced alcohol-related problems may be able to limit the amount they drink. If they can't stay within those limits, they need to stop drinking altogether.

If an alcoholic is unwilling to get help, what can you do about it?

This can be a challenge. An alcoholic can't be forced to get help except under certain circumstances, such as a traffic violation or arrest that results in court-ordered treatment. But you don't have to wait for someone to "hit rock bottom" to act. Many alcoholism treatment specialists suggest the following steps to help an alcoholic get treatment:

Stop all "cover ups." Family members often make excuses to others or try to protect the alcoholic from the results of his or her drinking. It is important to stop covering for the alcoholic so that he or she experiences the full consequences of drinking.

Time your intervention. The best time to talk to the drinker is shortly after an alcohol-related problem has occurred -- like a serious family argument or an accident. Choose a time when he or she is sober, both of you are fairly calm, and you have a chance to talk in private.

Be specific. Tell the family member that you are worried about his or her drinking. Use examples of the ways in which the drinking has caused problems, including the most recent incident.

State the results. Explain to the drinker what you will do if he or she doesn't go for help -- not to punish the drinker, but to protect yourself from his or her problems. What you say may range from refusing to go with the person to any social activity where alcohol will be served, to moving out of the house. Do not make any threats you are not prepared to carry out.

Get help. Gather information in advance about treatment options in your community. If the person is willing to get help, call immediately for an appointment with a treatment counselor. Offer to go with the family member on the first visit to a treatment program and/or an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting.

Call on a friend. If the family member still refuses to get help, ask a friend to talk with him or her using the steps just described. A friend who is a recovering alcoholic may be particularly persuasive, but any person who is caring and nonjudgmental may help. The intervention of more than one person, more than one time, is often necessary to coax an alcoholic to seek help.

Find strength in numbers. With the help of a health care professional, some families join with other relatives and friends to confront an alcoholic as a group. This approach should only be tried under the guidance of a health care professional who is experienced in this kind of group intervention.

Get support. It is important to remember that you are not alone. Support groups offered in most communities include Al-Anon, which holds regular meetings for spouses and other significant adults in an alcoholic's life, and Alateen, which is geared to children of alcoholics. These groups help family members understand that they are not responsible for an alcoholic's drinking and that they need to take steps to take care of themselves, regardless of whether the alcoholic family member chooses to get help.

You can call the National Drug and Alcohol Treatment Referral Routing Service (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment) at 1-800-662-HELP (4357) for information about treatment programs in your local community and to speak to someone about an alcohol problem.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Read the Original Article: Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Answers from Contributors (1)

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A.

One of the most common stumbling blocks, which prevent many people from getting the help that they need, is denial. Seeking assistance for chronic and excessive alcohol abuse is a step that many find difficult to take. According to Alcoholics Anonymous, there are two points that they make: if you cannot quit your alcohol abuse even if you want to; and if you cannot control how much you consume in one instance, then you are probably an alcoholic.    


Other questions that most self assessments ask are:

<!--[if !supportLists]-->·        <!--[endif]-->Does drinking make you feel shame or guilty?

<!--[if !supportLists]-->·        <!--[endif]-->Do you have alcohol cravings?

<!--[if !supportLists]-->·        <!--[endif]-->Are you at risk of losing your home, family or job because of your drinking?

<!--[if !supportLists]-->·        <!--[endif]-->Does drinking change your personality?

<!--[if !supportLists]-->·        <!--[endif]-->Do you miss work because of drinking?

<!--[if !supportLists]-->·        <!--[endif]-->Does drinking affect your home life?

<!--[if !supportLists]-->·        <!--[endif]-->Have you lost your ambition or goals because of drinking?

<!--[if !supportLists]-->·        <!--[endif]-->Do you have family members that have drinking problems?


If you can answer yes to any or all of those questions, according to the self scoring assessments and A.A., you are probably an alcoholic - or at least have an alcohol abuse problem.


Gallus Detox Centers is an inpatient medical detox facility specializing in IV therapy medical detox. If you have questions about our facility or detox method, please call us at 855-338-6929.

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User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice. Please see the
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